Do you regard the Cuban Missile Crisis as a success for containment? 

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The Cuban Missile Crisis occurred in October 1962. It was a tense standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union that almost led to nuclear war. The pilot of a US U-2 spy plane observed the assembly of medium-range ballistic missiles in Cuba, prompting a diplomatic crisis. Once installed...

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The Cuban Missile Crisis occurred in October 1962. It was a tense standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union that almost led to nuclear war. The pilot of a US U-2 spy plane observed the assembly of medium-range ballistic missiles in Cuba, prompting a diplomatic crisis. Once installed at that range, the missiles could easily reach the eastern United States.

President John F. Kennedy, together with close advisers, considered options for response over the next few days. Some called for the United States to destroy the missiles in an air strike and then invade Cuba. However, Kennedy decided instead to form a naval blockade of Cuba and at the same time warn Khrushchev, the Soviet leader, that the United States would not tolerate nuclear weapons on Cuban soil.

Tense days followed as the two superpowers negotiated. Eventually, it was agreed that the missiles would be removed from Cuba, and in exchange, the United States would agree not to invade Cuba and would also withdraw its Jupiter missiles from Turkey.

Containment was a Cold War policy that was initiated at the end of World War II. It was first explained in what became known as the "long telegram" from George Kennan, who was stationed at the US embassy in Moscow. It called for a policy that would isolate communism within the boundaries of the Soviet Union and its satellites and prevent it from spreading in a "domino effect" from one country to the next. This policy would form the basis for US foreign policy decision-making from then until the Cold War ended in 1991.

The Monroe Doctrine was a US policy initiated in 1823 by President James Monroe that the United States would consider any interference in the Western Hemisphere by outsiders as a hostile act. Kennedy invoked the Monroe Doctrine in a live television speech to the American people during the tense days of negotiation during the Cuban Missile Crisis:

It shall be the policy of this nation to regard any nuclear missile launched from Cuba against any nation in the Western Hemisphere as an attack by the Soviet Union on the United States, requiring a full retaliatory response upon the Soviet Union.

The ramifications of the Cuban Missile Crisis included a successfully negotiated agreement to withdraw the missiles. As a result, the Soviets realized that they would not be able to expand their influence in the Western Hemisphere. To this extent, the Cuban Missile Crisis was a success for containment.

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The results of the Cuban missile crisis and the Containment policy contrasted sharply because although the crisis ended amicably with better relations between the U.S and USSR, Cuba still went on to become a communist country. In effect, the containment policy which was against having a communist neighbor failed, but the end to the crisis was a success because the risk of direct warfare between the two opposing powers was diffused.

The Containment Policy was established to limit and reverse the gains made in the spread of communism. Several major countries and entire regions were falling to communism, which was a threat to the United States. The Containment Policy sought to support conflicting countries financially and militarily in order to stop their fall to communist influence, as seen when Truman’s administration sent $400 million to halt hostilities in Greece and Turkey. The Cuban missile crisis may have been an attempt by Russia to defend a fellow communist state (Cuba) from the U.S. which had already taken steps against her neighbor. Russia sent nuclear missiles to Cuba, but these were later on dismantled and shipped back to Russia after an amicable resolution between the U.S. and Russia. The U.S. also agreed not to invade Cuba unless directly provoked.

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I would regard the Cuban Missile Crisis as a success for containment, but only a very small one.  It did limit the spread of communist power, but the limitation was really very slight.

Containment was the main idea of US foreign policy during the Cold War.  This idea held that the US needed to prevent communism for spreading and becoming more powerful.  The Cuban Missile Crisis did accomplish this to a small degree.

The Cuban Missile Crisis began when the US found out that the Soviet Union had begun to set up medium range nuclear missiles in Cuba.  These missiles could easily reach US territory where Soviet missiles had never been able to reach.  Therefore, the placement of the missiles would have represented an expansion of communist power.  When the US got the Soviets to remove the missiles, it limited the expansion of communist power.

However, this was only a slight limitation.  The Soviets soon developed nuclear missiles that could easily hit anywhere in the world from the Soviets’ own territory.  This meant that removing the missiles from Cuba had essentially no long term impact on the spread of communist power.

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