Do you quote, italicize, or bold the title of a photograph in an MLA formatted essay?

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droxonian eNotes educator| Certified Educator

To expand a little on the answers above: the MLA guidelines recognize five distinct categories of photographs or images, all of which must be cited in slightly different ways. The citations are similar, but not identical, so be careful to use the right one for your circumstance. 

The types of citation are: 

1. a photograph you found in a museum; 

2. a photograph you found in a book; 

3. a photograph you found in a database; 

4. a photograph you found on a website; 

5. a digital image--that is, a picture from a website that may or may not be a photograph taken by a camera. 

The above answers already give reliable information about citing photograph types 1 and 2. To cite a photograph from a database, you should use the format below: 

Last, First M. Photograph Title. Year Created. Photograph. Museum/Institution, Location. Database Title. Web. Date Month Year Accessed.

When citing a digital image, your citation should specify that it is not a photograph, for the avoidance of confusion, as below: 

Last, First M. Title of Work. Digital Image. Website Title. Website Publisher, Date Month Year of Publication. Web. Date Month Year Accessed.

For the purposes of completion, although this information is given in the earlier answers, citations from a museum should look like this: 

Last, First M. Photograph Title. Year Created. Photograph. Museum/Institution, Location.

Citations referring to photographs in a book should look like this: 

Last, First M. Photograph Title. Year Created. Photograph. Museum/Institution, Location. Book Title. City: Publisher, Year Published. Page(s). Print.

Citations referring to photographs found online: 

Last, First M. Photograph Title. Year Created. Photograph. Museum/Institution, Location. Website Title. Web. Date Month Year Accessed.

Note that if you're citing a photograph you have found online but which is a reproduction of a photograph that can be seen elsewhere, such as in a museum, you can cite as if it were a photograph you yourself had found in a museum, without having to cite the online information or date of online publication. 

 

readerofbooks eNotes educator| Certified Educator

The above answer gives a good start, but with the greater accessibility of photos everywhere, it is important to know how to cite photos from different contexts. There is no one size fits all. So, based on context, you will have to make decisions. I will give you three possibilities and I will link one website for greater information. 

According to the MLA format, there are three main ways to cite a photo. 

First, if you find a photo in a museum, you should follow this format. 

Last, First. Photograph Title. Year Created. Photograph. Museum/Institution, Location.

Second, if you use a photo in book, which is more likely, then you use a slightly different format... 

Last, First M. Photograph Title. Year Created. Photograph. Museum/Institution, Location. Book Title. City: Publisher, Year Published. Page(s). 

Third, if you use a photo from a website, then there is another format. 

Last, First M. Photograph Title. Year Created. Photograph. Museum/Institution, Location. Website Title. Web. Date Month Year Accessed.

Kristen Lentz eNotes educator| Certified Educator

When citing a photograph, you italicize the title.  You should include the following information in this order:  name of photographer, title of photograph, date of composition, name of institute that houses the work, and then the name of the city where the institute is located. 

Example:  Riddle, Tom. Magic Donut. 2004. Museum of Magical History. London.

You can also use this same format for citing paintings and sculptures.

If your image comes from an online source, then the format changes a little:  Name of artist, title of work, medium of work, and then include the information for the website and the date accessed.

Example:  Riddle, Tom. Magic Donut.  Photograph. Photobuzz. Digimedia, 2004. Web. 13 Jan. 2013.