Do You Prefer Fiction or Nonfiction?Do you prefer fiction or nonfiction?  Why?

11 Answers | Add Yours

clairewait's profile pic

clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I've been a non-fiction kick myself recently.  I can't seem to get enough of memoirs and anything involving the food industry.  But I think this is just a phase.

scarletpimpernel's profile pic

scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I used to choose primarily fiction to read for leisure, but when I started teaching AP Lang. several years ago, I began reading mainly nonfiction.  Now, I find that I like both equally.  As Post 5 mentioned, there are high-interest, well-written nonfiction books available; so one can encounter a great real story in nonfiction--it's not limited to fiction.  I, too, really enjoy Jon Krakauer's books and have recently been reading more books like his.  David Cullen's Columbine is a sobering and thought-provoking read.

Because of all of the nonfiction reading I've been doing in recent years, when I do read fiction, I lean more toward historical or realistic fiction such as Glenn Taylor's works (The Marrowbone Marble Company).

MaudlinStreet's profile pic

MaudlinStreet | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

I like both...but judging from my bookshelves my passion is fiction. I'm certainly better at teaching AP Lit., as opposed to AP Lang., so there may be something there. I do love non-fiction, particularly historical and political non-fiction. I also enjoy non-fiction about food, if that makes sense. Anything about the food industry and its effects on one's health is fascinating to me, in addition to influencing one of the core values in my life.

But fiction draws me on an altogether different plane. I think it's because the craft of writing is so important to me. Not that non-fiction authors can't be great writers...but there's something about narrative and style in fiction that I feel is lacking in much non-fiction. I guess I'll always be searching for my symbols and metaphors, and fiction is where I find them.

teachertaylor's profile pic

teachertaylor | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

I've also recently started reading more nonfiction, mainly essays.  I was switched from teaching AP lit to AP lang, so I had to build up my knowledge of nonfiction.  I got my hands on 50 Essays and there are some great texts in there--my favorite is "A Modest Proposal" by Jonathan Swift.

lmetcalf's profile pic

lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

I am a huge fiction reader, always on the hunt for the next great story that I can then recommend to someone else.  I have certainly read some great non-fiction, but I like to become involved in the author's creative life.  I read to see what an author can do to an old story to make it new.  For example, boy meets girl is "old," so what can this author do to make me care?  Is it characterization?  Is it plot development?  Is it historical context?  Etc. 

susan3smith's profile pic

susan3smith | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted on

I prefer fiction.  But lately I have read some very good nonfiction:  Devil in a White City was so compelling for me that I had to take a trip to Chicago and try to find some of the places described in that work about World's Fair.  I also love just about anything by Jon Krakauer.  I especially enjoyed Under the Banner of Heaven.  With nonfiction, for some reason, I feel as if I am learning more.  And I have found that nonfiction accounts can be as entertaining as fictional ones, mainly because I know that they really happened.  I still reach for fiction when I have a choice, but I am not opposed to incorporating nonfiction into my personal reading.

marbar57's profile pic

marbar57 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

My personal genre is Historical Fiction.  I like history, but it's hard to digest in textbook form.  When you throw a few fictional characters into an event that actually happened, it comes alive for me and I truly enjoy it! 

If I can't get hold of Historical Fiction, I like a good Christian Romance. 

besure77's profile pic

besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

I also find both fiction and non fiction very enjoyable but I probably read more fiction that non fiction. I guess it really just depends on what I am in the mood for. Sometimes I am in the mood for a thriller while other times I am in the mood to escape to a fantasy world.

martinjmurphy's profile pic

martinjmurphy | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted on

I find both really enjoyable.  I tend to go read a lot of nonfiction, and then get burned out on it and want to escape reality and then go on a fiction binge. I usually enjoy a good mystery. I like reading books by John Lescroart.  I'm in the middle of his book Treasure Hunt.  I like his fiction because they take place in San Francisco and I live in the Bay Area.

udonbutterfly's profile pic

udonbutterfly | Student, College Freshman | (Level 1) Valedictorian

Posted on

I usually prefer fiction novels. I just feel like there is more of a variety there and I like to believe that the type of love presented in these novels are real. Then there is also the different types of worlds that happen in fiction novels. It's almost like jumping from universe to universe in the turn of a page. I like nonfiction stories as well they give me a good dose of realism every now and then but I think I like browsing the universe better.

billybobberkey's profile pic

billybobberkey | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) Honors

Posted on

My personal genre is Historical Fiction.  I like history, but it's hard to digest in textbook form.  When you throw a few fictional characters into an event that actually happened, it comes alive for me and I truly enjoy it! 

If I can't get hold of Historical Fiction, I like a good Christian Romance. 

I like reading historical fiction , too . I find that if you put it into  a non fiction book, i can't remember it as well as  do when i read fiction.

We’ve answered 318,982 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question