Do you perceive the end of Act III as a “turning point”? The end of Act III is often a climax or turning point in a play (Shakespeare plays, for instance).

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Lori Steinbach eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I believe the end of Act III is a turning point, though I do not necessarily believe it's the climax/crisis of the play--in other words, it's a turning point but not the turning point.  In the Proctor's relationship, this is a turning point, as each is willing to speak what they'd rather not in front of the court--he speaks the truth to save her, and she speaks a lie to save him.  John's willingness to make such a damning public confession (remember, adultery was an offense punishable by death in this community) does, indeed, cause the judges to reconsider the trustworthiness of the girls--and especially Abigail.  While all of this is true, nothing really changes; that's why I don't believe this is THE turning point in The Crucible

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amy-lepore eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Hale also begins to question the purpose of the judges in this Act as well.  His own unfaltering faith in the system is shaken and he begins to believe the girls have been lying...however, the judgements will not be reversed because they have already been made.  The court does not wish to undermine its own authority by admitting it was wrong, so more innocent people are made to die.

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pmiranda2857 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Act III, in The Crucible is a turning point, several important points of the plot turn leading to the resolution in Act IV.  For example, Proctor confesses to adultery in Act III in an effort to shake Abigail's hold over the court, instead of helping him, it seals his fate.

In order to prove the charge of adultery, Elizabeth Proctor is brought in to verify the claim, she lies to protect her husband's reputation.  

Mary Warren turns on Proctor under pressure from Abigail's charade about seeing a bird flying in the court, that she claims is Mary's spirit.  Mary accuses Proctor of trying to force her to follow the devil.

Proctor is arrested and thrown in jail along with Giles Corey, who refuses to...

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Susan Hurn eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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jazzyb543 | Student

this is all bullshit none of tis makes any snese