do you agree or not- criticism not appreciation finds the best in a manits a debating topic.........

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ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Wow. I thought I would have to ride the fence on this, but let's use different terms, and I can prove my case. What if we used the word feedback with regard to the other two terms. Constructive Feedback or appreciation feedback. I think man learns best from appreciateive feedback. This feedback is still constructive. You praise for behavior, choices, answers that are correct or appropriate. They learn from the appreciative feedback how to replicate the same types of behaviors or etc. in the future.

clairewait's profile pic

clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I do not necessarily agree.  I think it depends a great deal on the way that criticism and praise are given and on the personality of the people involved.

If I, for example, say to the first answerer "you're an idiot -- do you see how many words you have spelled wrong in your answer," it is not likely to help.  The first answerer will be annoyed by my lack of tact and will probably just be angry at me.

Also, it is just as possible to learn from praise as from criticism.  When I coach sports at the high school level, I tend to try to teach by praise.  I look to see when something has been done right and point it out.  I point out in detail what was right about it and in that way I can contrast it with a wrong way of doing it.  That works just as well for teaching, but avoids making anyone feel bad.

"...lack of tact..."

If the entire world became more direct (and therefore less tactful) tactlessness would not be nearly so offensive.  There's a major difference between students in the north and students in the south when it comes to criticism (often delievered in sarcasm).

People would not be as sensitive to criticism if it wasn't considered impolite.  I submit that blunt honesty is effective, as long as it is accompanied by a relationship with the person delivering it.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I do not necessarily agree.  I think it depends a great deal on the way that criticism and praise are given and on the personality of the people involved.

If I, for example, say to the first answerer "you're an idiot -- do you see how many words you have spelled wrong in your answer," it is not likely to help.  The first answerer will be annoyed by my lack of tact and will probably just be angry at me.

Also, it is just as possible to learn from praise as from criticism.  When I coach sports at the high school level, I tend to try to teach by praise.  I look to see when something has been done right and point it out.  I point out in detail what was right about it and in that way I can contrast it with a wrong way of doing it.  That works just as well for teaching, but avoids making anyone feel bad.

kart's profile pic

kart | Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

As far as I  am concerned ,criticism and not appreciation finds the best in man. While apreciating  ,one could appreciate only a man's good qualities.Does a man have only good qualities to be appreciated? the answer to this question is ,cetainly not. Man is a combination of good and bad qualities.When we keep on appreciating his goog ,what about his bad qualities?Only when  a person is creticised of his bad qualities ,he starts feeling for it and there is a chance for him to get rid of those bad qualities.After getting rid of his bad qualities he might become a better person worthy of the appereciation he receives.

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