Do we exist as something significant in this Universe Everyone knows that our body is made up of matter. But the matter itself is basically a collection of molecules which in turn are a combination of atoms. Thus essentially we are composed of atoms. Atoms have most of their mass concentrated in the nucleus whose size is very small as compared to the total size of the atom - the rest is a void. In the other hand concentration of mass in Black Holes is not comparable. So our phisycal existence seem to be a perception in this wast Universe - we do not exist significantly, and even if we exist, its mainly a void.  

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Philosophically, I like to think that all life is important. Realistically and scientifically, I think that each individual is a speck of dust in terms of importance to the universe. Yet there is only one planet we know of with life. This is significant. Especially considering the vast number of planets and stars, there might be more life out there, but as far as we know there is not.
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Since we aren't likely to ever know "THE ANSWER" to where life comes from or its purpose, we can only make the most of the "matter" we have and make whatever large or some impact we can in the smaller world we live in. I am referring to my immediate world. I have great significance in my family. I make significant contributions to the educationof the students in my classes. I do what I can to make my community stronger and more viable through volunteerism and economics. It makes my life meaningful that I can value my own significance in these ways.

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Yes, I think that significance is not a blanket term that we can apply to a species such as the human race. We need to be far more nuanced in how we think about such terms. For us, our significance is not defined by our existence but by what we do with it. This is the question that we should be asking ourselves.

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I love the answers of the previous posters. I could not agree more that it is not size which determines relevance; instead, significance is determined by an individual. I agree that partly "being alive and being conscious" which makes us significant as well.

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Amen #3!  We may be constructed of physical matter which is insignificant relative to the vast Universe, but the amount of matter--doesn't matter.  Current physics indicates that the makeup of subatomic particles of which the atoms are made are just wave forms.

What's important is what we do with this experience called life, even if it's to comprehend our origins and purpose.

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One might argue that, so far as we absolutely know, life in general -- and human life in particular -- is the only significant thing in the universe in the narrow sense that only living things are capable of creating and perceiving meaning and creating and perceiving value. It is possible that there are other living, conscious beings in the universe, and it is also possible that the entire universe was created by some kind of living, conscious being. It's possible to argue that these two criteria -- being alive and being conscious -- are the two criteria fundamental to significance.

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Surely our size is not what makes us significant or not significant.  I would argue that it is our humanity that makes us significant.  If you are religious, you can say it is our souls.  Whatever it is, it is not our size.  Just as you would not say that a larger human being is more significant than a smaller one, there is no reason to say that we are insignificant because we are small.

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