Do the Jim Crow Laws have an impact today?  Why or why not?   

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litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

If you think about it, there are plenty of people alive today who lived during the time of the Jim Crow laws. They are still shaped by those experiences. They also raised children who are shaped by them. The impact will continue for quite some time.
brettd's profile pic

brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

The nation was not only legally and racially segregated for generations, but it was also economically segregated, and this is the legacy we still witness today.  So if you were to travel into some cities and areas of the South, they are as segregated as ever.  While it is legal for both blacks and white to go to the same schools, be hired for the same jobs, and live in the same neighborhoods, schools, work environments and neighborhoods often are still largely segregated.  This is a direct legacy of the economics of Jim Crow, and will likely be with us as a society for some time.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Jim Crow laws continue to have an impact today, even though it is only an indirect impact.  These laws continue to have an impact today because of the fact that they affected so many people who are still alive today.  Their impacts on those people have trickled down to impact the lives of their offspring.

For example, a black person who is 60 years old today could easily have gone to segregated schools all their life (since schools were not instantly integrated after the Brown ruling of 1954).  This person could easily have received an inferior education.  Because of this, their life chances would have been reduced.

If that person was not able to get very far ahead in life, their children would be less advantaged as well.  They would have been born to a poorer, less educated family than they otherwise would have.  Those children might still be of college age today.

Because the educational and economic stauses of families have a huge impact on the chances of their children, the discrimination that happened up to 50 or 60 years ago continues to have an impact today.

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