Do the antibodies present in blood at the time of blood transfusion destroy the recipient's blood cells? For instance if we are transfusing O blood having anti A bodies to a patient of group A will the anti bodies destroy the blood cells of patient?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

It depends on the type doing the donation and the type receiving the donation.  If you are donating type "O" blood, type O is called the universal donor because it has neither A nor B antigen on its blood cells surface.  So it can be donated to types A, B,...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

It depends on the type doing the donation and the type receiving the donation.  If you are donating type "O" blood, type O is called the universal donor because it has neither A nor B antigen on its blood cells surface.  So it can be donated to types A, B, or AB without significant harm to the individual receiving the transfusion.  On the other hand, an individual with a type "O" blood type can only receive blood from a person with type O.  Blood typing has a long and storied history, dating back as early as the 1500s, when one of the Popes was administered what was considered a blood transfusion from three young boys.  The transfusion was administered orally, as this was before the time before knowledge about blood and circulation was common.  The Pope and the three young boys all died, as this method of transfusion had no appreciable positive health effects.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team