Do all cells undergo cell division? Give an example of cells that do not?

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Almost all the cells undergo division and only few exceptions are there. Cell division allows the formation of new cells to replace the old ones and hence keeps the cell concentration at reasonable levels and ensures their presence. One of the notable exceptions to cell division is nerve cells or...

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Almost all the cells undergo division and only few exceptions are there. Cell division allows the formation of new cells to replace the old ones and hence keeps the cell concentration at reasonable levels and ensures their presence. One of the notable exceptions to cell division is nerve cells or neurons or neuronal cells. These cells are highly specialized in their functions and do not undergo cell division like other cells. This means that when a neuron dies, we are unable to replace it. On a more positive note, lack of cell division among neurons ensures that they are few in number and that overcrowding does not take place. If neurons were to divide, there would be many neurons and complex, specialized functioning of neurons would become an extremely challenging task, with new neurons competing for the positions in neuronal system. And to ensure we do not lose out all our neurons, these cells generally have a long life.

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