Is the dissolving of sugar in water a chemical change?

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Dissolving of sugar in water is considered a physical change. Even though the appearance has changed (from white crystals to invisible in the water) and the phase has changed, from solid to solution, it is a physical change, not a chemical change, because the bonds between atoms haven’t changed. The...

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Dissolving of sugar in water is considered a physical change. Even though the appearance has changed (from white crystals to invisible in the water) and the phase has changed, from solid to solution, it is a physical change, not a chemical change, because the bonds between atoms haven’t changed. The sugar is still sugar, and you can taste it in the water, and if you let the water evaporate, you will recover the sugar.

Dissolving of a solid to make a solution is one of the trickier changes, because it can show one of the signs we usually associate with chemical change. As you probably recall, these include color change, production of a new substance, such as a gas or solid precipitate, and production of heat or light. Some substances release heat when dissolved in water, giving a warm solution, and others absorb heat to yield a cold solution, but these are still physical changes. You can always get the solid back by letting the water evaporate, so it has not changed chemically.

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