Discuss the representation of British rule in Tom Stoppard's Indian Ink.

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The representation of British rule in Tom Stoppard's Indian Inkis somewhat less than flattering.

The Raj, the name given to the British rule in India, is presented as something that has suppressed a rich and varied culture that has existed for thousands of years.

As Anish exclaims in...

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The representation of British rule in Tom Stoppard's Indian Ink is somewhat less than flattering.

The Raj, the name given to the British rule in India, is presented as something that has suppressed a rich and varied culture that has existed for thousands of years.

As Anish exclaims in a heartfelt outburst, India was already up to date when Britain was still a backward nation. Even when the British first discovered India in the age of Shakespeare, India already had more than its fair share of Shakespeares, not to mention great artists, composers, and architects.

The implication here is that the self-image of the Raj as a civilizing mission is completely bogus. The fact is that long before the British arrived, India was already civilized. That being the case, British rule of India can be seen as motivated by nothing more than greed and economic exploitation, as Anish doesn't hesitate to point out.

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