Discuss the symbolism behind Victor Frankenstein's crime against nature.  

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Victor is a mortal, but he suffers from extreme hubris (or pride) so much so that he believes that he can--and should--create human beings in a manner that defies nature and natural laws. He says,

Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which I should first break through, and pour a torrent of light into our dark world. A new species would bless me as its creator and source; many happy and excellent natures would owe their being to me. No father could claim the gratitude of his child so completely as I should deserve theirs. Pursuing these reflections, I thought that if I could bestow animation upon lifeless matter, I might in process of time (although I now found it impossible) renew life where death had apparently devoted the body to corruption.

Life and death, of course, are not imaginary boundaries for humans, at least not yet (and certainly not two hundred years ago). Victor believes that he can bring "light into [the] dark world" as a god would or could do. He thinks that he will...

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