Robinson Crusoe Questions and Answers
by Daniel Defoe

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Discuss Robinson Crusoe as a religious allegory.

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Robinson Crusoe is intended to be an allegory for what happens when we turn away from God. Crusoe has been washed up on a desert island where he's been provided with everything he needs to survive. Yet far from offering thanks to God for such bounties, he takes everything for granted. Unlike most Christians at the time, he doesn't see the benevolent hand of God at work: he doesn't see Providence.

It was such arrogance that originally led Crusoe to ignore his father's wishes and take to the high seas. In defying his father, Crusoe was also defying the Almighty, challenging the God-given social order in which fathers rule over their children as divine surrogates. It's not too hard to see this as an allegory...

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