Discuss male power in Morrison's The Bluest Eye. What is the dominant power in the society within The Bluest Eye?

Expert Answers info

Lorna Stowers eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2011

write4,625 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, Social Sciences, and History

There are a few examples of male power throughout Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye.

First, Pecola's brother, Samuel, is able to run away from their family violence because he is a boy. Pecola, on the other hand, is unable to do the same thing.

Another example of male power is Cholly's rape of his own daughter, Pecola. Not only does this illustrate man's physical power over a woman, but it also illustrates the patriarchal power over the family. Girls should not go against their fathers, even when they (the fathers) are deeply wrong. Although Cholly does flee after raping his daughter, this event...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 531 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

MaudlinStreet eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2009

write858 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, Social Sciences, and History

check Approved by eNotes Editorial


mkcapen1 | Student

In Toni Morrison's book "The Bluest Eye" the black females are controlled by the white males ideals of what is considered beautiful.  Pecola has a terrible image of herself.  She is dark skinned and considers herself to be ugly.  Her self esteem is lowered by her ideal that in order to be beautiful she needs to be white. 

The black males in Pecola's life have not been a positive influence.  Her father rapes her and abuses her.  He has power over her life, her body, and this has a negative effect on her self-esteem as well.  She is a victim. 

check Approved by eNotes Editorial