Discuss the irony in the frog's words of "your song must be your own" in "The Frog and the Nightingale."Discuss the irony in the frog's words of "your song must be your own" in "The Frog and the...

Discuss the irony in the frog's words of "your song must be your own" in "The Frog and the Nightingale."

Discuss the irony in the frog's words of "your song must be your own" in "The Frog and the Nightingale."

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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In the end, it seems to me that any advice that the frog could give would be shrouded in irony.  The frog cares little about the nightingale.  He sees her as competition, something to be eliminated.  Yet, being savvy enough to fully understand that the nightingale is well- liked by "the public," he has to devise another way to eliminate her from the "music scene" of the bog.  In the end, his counsel and advice to her is the veiled attempt to eliminate her from the picture.  When he says to her that her song "must be" her own, it brings to light that he is more interested in making her do what he wants her to do.  There is little there that reflects the basic idea of autonomy because the frog wants to control the nightingale in order to bring her down and consolidate his own power over the music scene of the bog.  In the advice of "your song must be your own," there is irony because the frog actually wants the nightingale to sing the song that the frog wants her to sing, a song that will spell her own destruction.

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