Discuss the importance of weather in a specific literary work, not in terms of plot.

Expert Answers
Ashley Kannan eNotes educator| Certified Educator

Shakespeare places a great level of importance on weather in his works.  For example, weather figures prominently in Macbeth.  The opening scene when we meet the witches is one where skies are overcast and an ominous tone in the weather is struck.  Duncan is also killed when bad weather is present.  In King Lear, the madness scene is staged in the midst of a brutal storm which fits the scene quite perfectly given Lear's state of mind.  We can see this in other plays, as well, such as the appropriately titled, "The Tempest."  This theory of correspondence is a strong theme in Shakespeare's works where the weather is almost a side character in the plays and drama.   It might not be part of the plot, but the audience is forced to reckon with the fact that the weather is a part of the unfolding sequence of events.

singerforchrist | Student

Just out of curiousity, what elements of weather did you discuss in Dracula? I have to "discuss the importance of weather in a specific literary work, not in terms of plot" as well...