Discuss how women (colonial, Native American, African American, loyalists) impacted Colonial America, the Revolutionary War, and U.S. Independence from 1700-1783.

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During the early years of European settlement in the New World, men were the primary residents.  Over time, more and more women settled in what became the Thirteen Colonies.  Families were established and the population grew.  Women typically worked in the home during this time, though some became writers, teachers,...

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During the early years of European settlement in the New World, men were the primary residents.  Over time, more and more women settled in what became the Thirteen Colonies.  Families were established and the population grew.  Women typically worked in the home during this time, though some became writers, teachers, and midwives.  

The tale of Pocahontas saving the life of John Smith was one that showed an influential Native American woman.  According to the story, Pocahontas stopped her father from executing Smith outside of Jamestown, Virginia.  

Many women were transported to Colonial America to be slaves.  One such slave was Phyllis Wheatley.  She was the first African American poet to be published.

When ideas of Revolution and independence from England began to develop, some women supported the cause.  Many women stayed involved in the events leading to the Revolutionary War through their husbands.  Theodosia Burr, Aaron Burr's wife, welcomed Revolutionary War generals and other military leaders to stay in her home.  She was greatly interested in the ideas behind independence.  Abigail Adams, the wife of John Adams, advised her husband frequently.  They often discussed politics together.

Loyalist women were frequently snubbed and treated badly by Patriots.  Many loyalist women fed and gave shelter to British soldiers and military leaders.  Some women, both loyalist and patriot, served as nurses or followed the armies to be near their husbands.

While women did not serve in politics or as soldiers, many still held strong political views.  Some women helped where they could, such as nursing or feeding soldiers.

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