Discuss how metafiction is used in "Goodbye, Snauq" by Lee Maracle.

"Goodbye, Snauq" is metafictional in the sense that it is a story about stories, and the relationship between story and memory.

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One way of defining metafiction is that it is fiction which calls attention to its own status as fiction, or its own means of production. The metafictional characteristics of "Goodbye, Snauq" are fairly complex. I'll try to summarize:

1) The story of the teaching assistant contains or frames several other...

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One way of defining metafiction is that it is fiction which calls attention to its own status as fiction, or its own means of production. The metafictional characteristics of "Goodbye, Snauq" are fairly complex. I'll try to summarize:

1) The story of the teaching assistant contains or frames several other stories. These include the story of the settlers coming to the Sqaumish lands in British Columbia; the story of the narrator's ancestors and their disenfranchisement by the whites; the story of Snauq and the way of life there, and its destruction; and the story of resitiution, which is still unfolding for the narrator.

2) Part of the narrator's problem is that, for him, these stories are incomplete. The picture of Khatsalano is like a totem for him, in that it both fixes the reality of his ancestors' experience, and stands for the mystery of his past that has been lost to him forever.

3) The text of the story "Goodbye, Snauq" can be seen as an attempt to resolve this incompleteness; the story's own status as narrative in a way is an attempt to fill in the gaps of the narrator's understanding. This is mirrored, in the text, by the goodbye ceremony itself.

From a metafictional perspective, then, we can read the story as an account of its own creation, a kind of recursive "farewell" and reimagining of the past.

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