Discuss how the Columbian Exchange between the Old and New Worlds affected both societies.

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The Colombian Exchange was very beneficial for Europeans. Europeans gained many new vegetables from the New World such as squash, tomatoes, and potatoes. This new influx of vitamins increased European birth rates as well as longevity. The downside to this was an increase in the European population that led to...

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The Colombian Exchange was very beneficial for Europeans. Europeans gained many new vegetables from the New World such as squash, tomatoes, and potatoes. This new influx of vitamins increased European birth rates as well as longevity. The downside to this was an increase in the European population that led to overcrowding, poverty, and wars as nations competed over dwindling resources.

The Colombian Exchange had mainly bad effects for the Native Americans. Many died due to smallpox and other diseases. The small number of Spanish conquistadors who arrived in Central and South America could have never defeated the native empires there without the spread of disease. European pigs also rooted through Native American fields, destroying crops and causing unrest between Europeans and natives. The Colombian Exchange brought the horse to the New World—the horse allowed the Plains tribes to become more mobile in their buffalo hunts. Horses would eventually be considered a wealth symbol for the Plains tribes.

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The Old World—that is, Europe—derived enormous benefits from the Columbian Exchange. In the short-to-medium term new crops were introduced to Europe, such as potatoes and tomatoes, that would radically diversify agriculture on the continent. This made it possible for more farmers to produce more food, thus minimizing the ever-present threat of famine. As a result, European society became more stable, less prone to the destabilizing effects of chronic food shortages.

As for the indigenous society of the New World, the effects of the Columbian Exchange were generally negative. As well as introducing diseases to which the natives had no natural immunity, the Europeans introduced a number of animals into the New World, which had a negative impact on the delicate eco-system. In societal terms, these factors had a catastrophic effect on the indigenous people, leading to the eventual dispersement of native tribes away from their traditional hunting grounds, which in turn made it easier for European settlers to steal their land.

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The Columbian Exchange was the exchange of crops, livestock, and disease from the "Old World," which consisted of Europe, Africa, and Asia, to the "New World" of the Americas.

Some of the new goods that benefited the "Old World" were agricultural staples like tomatoes, potatoes, corn, cassava (which became the staple African "manioc"), beans, and sweet potatoes. As a result of the new foods transported to the "Old World," population increased; this was possible because the variety of new foods and nutrition allowed people to live longer. The Columbian Exchange also encouraged other explorers to make their way to the "New World" in search of land and new treasures; it was like a doorway to new riches that Europeans took advantage of in the form of forced labor and mercantilism.

The "New World" also got new crops, like sugar and citrus fruits, but the impact of the Columbian Exchange was remarkably worse on the native inhabitants. Afroeurasians (that is, people who lived in Africa-Europe-Asia) had been communicating and exchanging for centuries, but the native inhabitants of the Americas were isolated. One of the biggest problems with a new contact with the "Old World" was the transmission of disease. Smallpox, carried with "Old World" explorers, wiped out large portions of American populations; historians estimate anywhere between fifty and eighty percent of total populations. Entire civilizations crashed, like the Aztec in central Mexico and the Inca in South America. Europeans took advantage of the "New World" lands and people by setting up plantations, where indigenous Americans or African slaves worked to grow crops like tobacco, sugarcane, coffee, indigo, and cotton.

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