Discuss George and Lennie's dream in Of Mice and Men?

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William Delaney eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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I think it might be argued that the so-called "dream" or "American dream" in Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men is not George and Lennie's shared dream but really George's dream alone. He has confided his dream to Lennie because he does a lot of talking to Lennie, although his companion doesn't always understand what he is talking about. Lennie is not capable of inventing such a complex dream. In fact, whenever the subject comes up he can only seem to imagine it in terms of having rabbits to feed and fondle. Lennie has to hear George describe it to him, and he believes in it as a potential reality even though George may only regard it as an idea to play with in his mind. George probably does not mention his dream to any other person but Lennie because Lennie is the only person who would share it with him. 

George's dream is infectious. First Lennie is infected, then Candy, and finally Crooks. George is the only creative person among them. He is compensating for his dissatisfaction and...

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mwestwood eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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