Discuss and explain the rhyme scheme of the poem "The voice" by Thomas Hardy.

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The poem uses a standard ABAB rhyme scheme but with a twist. First, in an ABAB scheme, the end words of the first and third lines of a stanza rhyme, as do the end words of the second and fourth lines. We see this in "The Voice," for example, in the third stanza:

Or is it only the breeze, in its listlessness
Travelling across the wet mead to me here,
You being ever dissolved to wan wistlessness,
Heard no more again far or near?

However, Hardy adds to the rhyme scheme by having the last three words or syllables in the "A" lines (line one and three) rhyme in the first three stanzas, and the last two syllables of the A...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 352 words.)

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