Discuss and defend your directorial concept for A Doll's House.

http://www.shakespeare-online.com/plays/thedollshouse/doll1_2.html A Doll's House is a play that is meant to be performed, not read at home or in a classroom setting. The director of A Doll's House must consider how the audience will react to certain actions, such as Nora putting her husband's boots by the fire or hiding Krogstad's letter behind the clock. The director must also consider how the characters' actions might affect certain lines of dialogue and what they could mean when they are spoken by one character but not another. The most common way to stage A Doll's House is to set it in modern times. According to "CliffsNotes"

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One of the first things you'll want to consider in your directorial concept of A Doll's House is the central conflict between Nora and her society. Do you want to present this conflict as a part of history and therefore set it in the past? Or is Nora's struggle present...

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One of the first things you'll want to consider in your directorial concept of A Doll's House is the central conflict between Nora and her society. Do you want to present this conflict as a part of history and therefore set it in the past? Or is Nora's struggle present in our modern society? Examining Nora's struggle with Torvald within the context of a modern society could be an interesting and creative angle to explore. If you choose to place Nora in our modern society, what details of the play might you need to update?

Also consider how you want to characterize the Helmers through casting. Is Torvald physically imposing, which adds to his ability to control Nora? Or is he an average man, which gives further credence that society itself has created an environment which oppresses Nora? Is Nora strikingly beautiful and well-versed in manners of class? How are the expectations of society reflected in her dress, mannerisms, and makeup? Similarly, as Nora evolves as a character, how can you reflect this in her costuming and demeanor? For example, she might stand closer to Torvald and may demonstrate more physical affection toward him in the beginning of the play than she does near the end.

As you think of your directorial concept, it might be helpful to jot down three to five words that you believe capture the mood of the play. How can you bring this mood to life on the stage? How will lighting and props convey the mood you have chosen? Consider how Nora's new sense of empowerment could also be reflected in the lighting at the end of the play. Will you need music in moments of transition to help convey a particular mood? If so, what pieces might you select? Will these selections be representative of the historical context of the play when it was written, or will you choose more contemporary pieces that may connect more with your audience?

You will find a couple of links below to help you further consider the effects of costuming and lighting as you bring your directorial concept to the stage.

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