Give an example of direct characterization of Andy from Sharon M. Draper's Tears of a Tiger (please include the page number).

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Sharon M. Draper's Tears of a Tiger makes use of different accounts and literary styles to push the story forward. It presents its characters from various angles with different levels of engagement, making the reader part of the various intimate spaces they inhabit. It feels as if one were...

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Sharon M. Draper's Tears of a Tiger makes use of different accounts and literary styles to push the story forward. It presents its characters from various angles with different levels of engagement, making the reader part of the various intimate spaces they inhabit. It feels as if one were eavesdropping or peeping into each character's personal mode of expression. This complete eradication of a narrator almost removes any direct characterization, as it becomes the responsibility of the reader to piece together character traits that are ever only insinuated throughout the story.

There are, however, moments of direct characterization. The one I'd like to highlight is from the chapter "Accepting Fear—Escaping Pain" (page 112). This is a conversation between Andy and his psychologist. When Andy gets asked if he ever thinks about death, he admits to actually thinking about it all the time. His psychologist then asks if it ever frightens him, to which he responds:

—Yeah, sometimes. It seems like bein’ dead is the only way I’ll ever feel alive again. Does that make sense?

This is where his psychologist will be giving his direct characterization of Andy. Throughout the book, we are used to hearing him ask all the questions, with Andy candidly answering them. Here, Andy asks the candid question and gets a direct answer that also illuminates his character:

—Sure it does, Andy. You’re hurting and you can’t find an escape from the pain and you’re frightened because the only way out seems to be something you can’t even verbalize. Am I right?

To Andy, he couldn't be any more right.

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A direct characterization refers to a direct comment made about a character's external or internal attributes. A reader, when given direct characterizations, knows exactly who the character is. The reader does not have to infer about the character based upon indirect characterizations (where attributes and characteristics are hidden).

On page three of Sharon M. Draper's Tears of a Tiger, Draper provides a direct characterization of Andy (Andrew Jackson) through a conversation between Andy and Rob (Robert Washington). During a locker room conversation, the boys are discussion their basketball skills. Andy states that he is a "superstar shooter and lover to the ladies." The "superstar shooter" defines Andy using direct characterization. This phrase tells readers that Andy is a good basketball player. "Lover to the ladies" can be looked at as either direct or indirect characterization. Depending upon the reader's knowledge of slang used to describe playboys, Andy's confession of being a "ladies' man" may be easily understood (direct characterization) or in need of explanation (indirect characterization).

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