Did Young Goodman Brown make a good decision after leaving the forest?

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After Goodman Brown loses his faith by participating in the Black Mass alongside prominent religious figures in his community, he becomes suspicious of everyone and turns into a meditative, distrustful man. Goodman Brown does not make a specific decision to reject his community's religious leaders but simply reacts to his...

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After Goodman Brown loses his faith by participating in the Black Mass alongside prominent religious figures in his community, he becomes suspicious of everyone and turns into a meditative, distrustful man. Goodman Brown does not make a specific decision to reject his community's religious leaders but simply reacts to his terrifying experience in the wilderness. Goodman Brown's suspicions are a result of his guilt and shame, which corresponds to his decision to abandon his faith and embrace his sins. Through Goodman Brown's experience and difficult, gloomy life, Hawthorne illustrates the consequences of losing one's faith and living with overwhelming guilt. After Goodman's dream, he views Deacon Gookin and Goody Cloyse with suspicion and turns pale whenever the minister preaches about hellfire and damnation. He is also unable to sleep at night and develops into a grave, depressed man. One can surmise that Goodman's guilt stems from suppressing his sins, and his altered personality is a reflection of how his hidden sins corrupt his entire being. Overall, Goodman’s decision to participate in the Black Mass and abandon his faith leave him overwhelmed with guilt and suspicion. He no longer trusts the religious figures in his community and lives the remainder of his life as a depressed, melancholy man.

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I don't know that Goodman Brown really makes a decision to behave the way he does after he wakes up the morning after he spends the night in the forest.  Earlier in the story, Brown had made the decision to abandon his religious faith, represented by his wife, Faith, and embrace sin by going into the forest.  Although she begged him to stay with her, he would not, and he thought to himself, "'after this one night, I'll cling to her skirts and follow her to Heaven.'"  However, this is not the way faith works; we cannot simply put it down and pick it back up again when it is convenient for us.  In making this decision, Brown essentially alienates himself from God; so, when he returns, "he shrank from the bosom of Faith" and becomes a "stern, a sad, a darkly meditative, a distrustful, if not a desperate man [...]."  He doesn't decide to become mistrustful or faithless.  It just happens as a result of the bad decisions he'd made earlier in the story. 

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