Did Oedipus Rex ever sleep with his mother?

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Many years prior to the events portrayed in Sophocles's Oedipus Rex, the Oracle foretells that Oedipus would kill his father, Laius, King of Thebes, and marry his mother, Queen Jocasta.

In order to avoid the prophecy, Laius orders a shepherd to take Oedipus and abandons him to...

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Many years prior to the events portrayed in Sophocles's Oedipus Rex, the Oracle foretells that Oedipus would kill his father, Laius, King of Thebes, and marry his mother, Queen Jocasta.

In order to avoid the prophecy, Laius orders a shepherd to take Oedipus and abandons him to die on a mountainside. The shepherd takes pity on the child and gives him to another shepherd, who takes Oedipus to Corinth, where he is adopted by King Polybus and Queen Merope and brought up as their son.

When Oedipus is a young man, a drunken partygoer shouts to him, "Thou art not the true son of thy sire!" When Oedipus askes Polybus and Merope about it, they don't give him a straight answer, so Oedipus goes to the Oracle at Delphi.

OEDIPUS: So privily without their leave I went
To Delphi, and Apollo sent me back
Baulked of the knowledge that I came to seek.
But other grievous things he prophesied,
Woes, lamentations, mourning, portents dire;
To wit I should defile my mother's bed
And raise up seed too loathsome to behold,
And slay the father from whose loins I sprang.

Thinking that Polybus and Merope are his real parents, Oedipus leaves Corinth to avoid fulfilling the prophecy and gos to Thebes. On the way to Thebes, he unknowingly kills King Laius, his real father.

When Oedipus gets to Thebes, he solves the riddle of the Sphynx, relieving the Theban people of a plague, and is made King of Thebes. He is rewarded with marriage to Laius's wife—Jocasta. So Oedipus does, indeed, kill his father and marry his mother.

Oedipus and Jocasta have four children—two girls, Antigone and Ismene, and two boys, Eteocles and Polyneices. Although the children aren't quite so "loathsome" as the Oracle would have Oedipus believe they would be, life isn't much better for Antigone, Ismene, Eteocles, and Polyneices than it is for Oedipus.

In Greek mythology, and in Sophocles's Antigone, Eteocles and Polyneices kill each other in battle during a civil war in Thebes. Antigone is sentenced to death by her uncle, Creon (Oedipus' brother), for burying Polyneices against his direct order, and she is entombed alive until she dies.

Although Ismene has nothing to do with Antigone burying Polyneices and actually warns her against it, she begs Creon to give her the same punishment as her sister. Although Ismene is led out of Creon's palace with Antigone, we later learn about Antigone's death, but we learn nothing at all about Ismene's fate.

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The story hinges on the fact that Oedipus marries his mother. We know that they have slept together because they have children. The marriage was clearly consummated more than once, or the children would not have been conceived. Showing that children have been born is traditionally the polite and tactful way of indicating that two people have been sexually intimate.

Oedipus fully accepts that he has married (and slept with) his own mother, just as Jocasta accepts she has married and slept with her son. Jocasta kills herself over it, and Oedipus blinds himself as a result. These are extreme reactions to unintentionally violating the taboo of incest. These reactions reveal that these characters know they have been sexually involved with each other. Both have internalized their society's belief that this is deeply unacceptable behavior.

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I don't mean to be crude, but no -- fictional characters don't have sex. However, in the story, Oedipus and Jocasta live together as man and wife, king and queen, for years after his father is declared dead. The story depends on this fact and the oracle's prophecy depends on it. It wouldn't be a tragedy, and Oedipus would not blind himself (he would say "whew!" and move on. Most seriously, however, you must separate literary, dramatic details from physiological reality.
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