In The Diary of Anne Frank, what is Mr. Frank like as the families settle in to their hiding place? 

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Mr. Frank is mild-mannered and patient.  He tries to help Anne and the others feel comfortable.

In the second scene, we see Mr. Frank in his prime.  He is doing the best he can to make the most of the difficult situation. He begins with describing the living conditions for their...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

Mr. Frank is mild-mannered and patient.  He tries to help Anne and the others feel comfortable.

In the second scene, we see Mr. Frank in his prime.  He is doing the best he can to make the most of the difficult situation. He begins with describing the living conditions for their hiding place.  The family can’t wear shoes during the day and they have to burn all of their trash.  They even have to be careful about when to visit the W.C. (bathroom).  Mr. Frank is always gracious and apologetic to everyone.

This is the way we must live until it is over, if we are to survive. There is silence for a second.

MRS. FRANK. Until it is over.

MR. FRANK, reassuringly. After six we can move about ... we can talk and laugh and have our supper and read and play games ... just as we would at home. (Act 1, Scene 2) 

Mr. Frank provides a gift of a diary for Anne.  He goes out of his way to help Anne, the youngest one there, feel comfortable.  The diary enables her to share her deepest thoughts, because Anne is a sensitive girl and she often feels left out.  

Mr. Frank also tries to help Anne look on the bright side. 

As a matter of fact, between us, Anne, being here has certain advantages for you. For instance, you remember the battle you had with your mother the other day on the subject of overshoes? You said you'd rather die than wear overshoes? But in the end you had to wear them? Well now, you see, for as long as we are here you will never have to wear overshoes! (Act 1, Scene 2)

Mr. Frank tells her this in reaction to a moment of panic Anne has when it finally hits her that being in hiding means she can never go outside.  She can't go out again until the war is over.  Her father's calm gentle reminders about the little ways in which her life will go on help her to get over her panic.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team