In "The Diary of Anne Frank," what would be a possible motive behind Anne's asking Peter if he likes Margot? What is she trying to discover about Peter and his feelings for her?

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Anne's asking about Margot has a lot to do with her own insecurities. Like any teenage girl, she feels awkward. In her family, she is viewed as less accomplished than her sister. Margot is considered smart and pretty, while Anne is considered more of a "class clown" type. Anne is...

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Anne's asking about Margot has a lot to do with her own insecurities. Like any teenage girl, she feels awkward. In her family, she is viewed as less accomplished than her sister. Margot is considered smart and pretty, while Anne is considered more of a "class clown" type. Anne is trying to find out if Peter agrees with this assessment, so she can discover if it is worth pursuing him or not.

Anne wants Peter to appreciate her on her own individual terms. She wants a relationship where she isn't constantly being compared to her older sister. Aside from Margot, Peter is the only other teenager in the annex. So, Anne's motive has everything to do with her own self-image and wanting to know where she stands with Peter (can they be more than friends, essentially).

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In act 2, scene 2, Anne and Peter meet as though they are on a date. Anne is worried about Margot feeling left out, so she asks her sister if she likes Peter. Margot says that she doesn't like him in a romantic way, but she would like to have a boy to talk to sometimes. Margot tells Anne not to feel guilty for liking Peter. Once Anne understands where Margot stands on the idea of Anne bonding with Peter, she wants to find out where Peter stands concerning his preference for either sister. Anne directly brings up Margot in her conversation with Peter as follows:

"You like Margot, don't you? Right from the start you liked her, liked her much better than me. . . It's all right. Everyone feels that way. Margot's so good. She's sweet and bright and beautiful and I'm not."

Anne is fishing for information about Peter's feelings because she is self-conscious about her behavior compared to Margot's. It's not her fault that she compares herself to Margot, though; she learned how to do that from her parents and the other adults who tell her to be more like her sister. Anne not only wonders if Peter likes her more than Margot, but she also wants to know how much of a wall to put up between her and Peter so she won't get hurt in the future. Remember that she is also two years younger than Peter, too. She hasn't dated much, so she is bound to have a few insecurities. 

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