Is the device of foreshadowing in the novel effective or does Victor's blatant foreshadowing reveal too much?Is the device of foreshadowing in the novel effective or does Victor's blatant...

Is the device of foreshadowing in the novel effective or does Victor's blatant foreshadowing reveal too much?

Is the device of foreshadowing in the novel effective or does Victor's blatant foreshadowing reveal too much?

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missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Victor's most blatant moment of foreshadowing occurs when the letters reveal a strange man rescued by the author of the letter. This strange man we later learn is Victor and his story reveals that he was chasing an even larger man. By the end of the book, we completely catch up to this situation. That larger man is foreshadowing the presence of the creature Victor eventually creates.

For my students, they often jump to a conclusion not too much later that the larger man was the monster of Frankenstein. The reason they make that assumption has to do with the frequency that this literary phenomenon has made it into pop culture. Mary Shelley was 19 when she wrote this work, and many critics consider her work immature because of how much she reveals at early points in the book. However, in my very first read of Frankenstein as an adult having not ever seen the movie, I found her clues throughout the text effective because it built my intrigue and suspense.

The introduction of the character Elizabeth as an adoptive child and the suggestions of a relationship between Victor and Elizabeth in the future are blatant as well, but Victor's character is so questionable that it keeps the foreshadowing from being easily accepted. You really don't know what Victor will do.

I think her foreshadowing is certainly blatant, but it doesn't give it away completely, therefore I would argue that it is effective.

 

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