Determine whether Interphase, early prophase, or late prophase. Discuss the stage of mitosis indicated by the abbreviated statements below: 1.) Has only fragments of nuclear envelope.  2.) Plate...

Determine whether Interphase, early prophase, or late prophase. Discuss the stage of mitosis indicated by the abbreviated statements below:

1.) Has only fragments of nuclear envelope. 

2.) Plate forms across center of mitotic area.

3.) Chromatin is condensed. 

4.) Daughter chromosomes separate.

5.) Cytokinesis accelerates to completion.

Expert Answers
trophyhunter1 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

For the first part of the question, interphase is a time when cells synthesize organelles, grow, replicate the DNA and grow once more before mitotic division occurs.  At the start of  prophase, chromosomes are tightly coiled and seen as pairs of sister chromatids, joined by their centromeres. The spindle begins to form, nucleoli disappear and centrosomes move away from each other toward opposite sides of the cell by late prophase.

For the second part of the question, I have addressed each statement.

For statement 1, the nuclear envelope fragments during late prophase to prometaphase.

For statement 2, a cell plate derived from vesicles is visualized at the middle of the plant cell  by late telophase. Its purpose is to divide the cytoplasm between two daughter cells and it will become integrated into the cell wall.

For statement 3, chromatin material of the nucleus is condensed by prophase at which time it can be seen under the microscope as tightly coiled chromosomes.

For statement 4, the daughter chromosomes you refer to were called sister chromatids when they were joined but which separate once the centromeres divide during anaphase.

For statement 5, cytokinesis accelerates to completion during telophase and is rapidly occurring by late telophase resulting in the division of the cytoplasm between the two daughter cells.

I have included a chart of the cell cycle to better visualize the steps.

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