Despite Amir's courage to rescue Sohrab, he was essentially a self-centred boy who did not redeem himself. DiscussThese are point I'll be talking about in the body of the essay.  Please give...

Despite Amir's courage to rescue Sohrab, he was essentially a self-centred boy who did not redeem himself. Discuss

These are point I'll be talking about in the body of the essay.  Please give you point of view.  Thanks

-Baba and his complex father son relation which led to tragey

-Amir as a young boy was a selfish and cowardly boy. As a result of his yearning for his father's love, he betrayed Hassan

-As he matures he continues to carry these traits.  In trying to forget he was reluctant to follow Rahim's advice saying "I have a house..."

-However it is unresonable to simply state that he did not redeem himself, since he not only atoned for his sin but also for Baba's.

 

I'm not really sure about the first point....please if you think these are wrong please say it so i may change it. :)

Asked on by mzlaila

2 Answers | Add Yours

mshurn's profile pic

Susan Hurn | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Perhaps you should think more about Amir as an adult. When he and Baba escaped from Afghanistan, he was still a boy. They left their old, comfortable, privileged life behind. When they settled in California, they were poor. Baba became a laborer, one who worked very hard in a job that would have been very much beneath him in the old life. Amir is no longer the selfish son of a rich, powerful man. He watches his father work without complaint and is impressed by it. Amir joins his father and works by his side in trying to earn a few dollars by locating cast off goods to sell at a neighborhood flea market. They become close in a way that would not have been possible had they remained members of the privileged class in Afghanistan. Baba speaks for his son when Amir wants to marry, another act of love between them. When Baba becomes sick and is dying of cancer, Amir feels much pain and takes care of his father with love and tenderness. Amir had grown up and changed a great deal by the time he is called to return to Afghanistan. If he were still the spoiled and selfish boy he had once been, he could not have gone at all, much less risk his life in the process.

ladyvols1's profile pic

ladyvols1 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

Your thesis statement, "despite Amir's courage to rescue Sohrab, he was essentially a self-centred boy who did not redeem himself," is of course a valid point of view, but I do not agree with it.  Put yourself in the place of this young boy.  He and Hassan have just gone through a wonderful kite-flying contest and won.  They are on top of the world.  Hassan goes off to retrieve the kite and tells Amir that he would chase the kite a "1000 times over..." 

Amir begins to wonder what happened to his friend and goes to find him.  He sees a group of older boys raping and beating up Hassan.  What would you have done?  Would you have run in screaming and trying to beat off these boys knowing that they could kill you?  I doubt it.  You probably would have done exactly what Amir did; you would have hid. 

Now the reason Amir's father appeared to be disappointed in Amir was because he was a pacifist.  He was timid and afraid to stand up for himself.  Amir was self-centered, spoiled, and had been brought up to realize that even though he and Hassan were friends, they were not equals.  In his heart he did not really understand this but as most people brought up in a blessed life, he was arrogant. 

His return to Kabul did not bring back Hassan, or make up for all of the negative and hurtful things he did toward Hassan, but by saving his nephew, Sohrab, he did indeed redeem himself.  He overcame fear, death, and hate to save the son of his half-brother.  Amir broke the curse of guilt and hatred.  He won in the end as he chased Sohrab's kite. " ...For you a 1000 times over..."

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