In the description of Aunt Alexandra in Chapter 13 of To Kill a Mockingbird, it says "she was born in the objective case". What would that mean? A stickler for grammar? Someone always on the...

In the description of Aunt Alexandra in Chapter 13 of To Kill a Mockingbird, it says "she was born in the objective case". What would that mean? A stickler for grammar? Someone always on the receiving side?

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Scout's description of her Aunt Alexandra being "born in the objective case" is a clever play on words by To Kill a Mockingbird author Harper Lee. The objective case is a grammar term referring to objective pronouns (used in the oblique case). Two of the most commonly used objective pronouns are "me" and "her." I believe that the author was trying to say that Aunt Alexandra is mainly concerned with "herself," and that everything is "about her:" She is a "me" person--all things that happen she relates to how they affect "her." I believe that the author probably also used the term to suggest that she objected to many things--Calpurnia's role in the house, Scout's unladylike ways, Atticus' parenting skills, Atticus' defense of Tom Robinson, Walter Cunningham's presence in the Finch home, her husband's lazy ways, etc.