Describe Vladimir and Estragon.

In Waiting for Godot, Vladimir and Estragon are humble, ordinary, everyman characters representing the average person in an absurdist universe.

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Vladimir and Estragon are the everyman representations of Waiting for Godot 's absurd universe. An everyman character is a representation of an ordinary person. They are normally humble in almost every way so that a broad amount of audience members will be able to connect with them. With this definition...

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Vladimir and Estragon are the everyman representations of Waiting for Godot's absurd universe. An everyman character is a representation of an ordinary person. They are normally humble in almost every way so that a broad amount of audience members will be able to connect with them. With this definition in mind, Vladimir and Estragon fit the description: both are humble, and both are rather ordinary. Their anxiety and fruitless wait for Godot also represent a more existential dread that all people might experience at one point or another, particularly in regards to discerning what the meaning of life might be.

Their status as tramps also cements this everyman idea. The sort of tramp costume that tends to be worn by the actors playing Vladimir and Estragon suggests the movie comedian Charlie Chaplin, specifically his Little Tramp character. The Little Tramp was an everyman himself, a humble misfit often seeking adventure or love. His exploits were filled with slapstick and sentimental episodes. Though he was homeless and a social outcast, the Little Tramp's movies were often positive in outlook, if critical of society's attitudes towards the poor.

Vladimir and Estragon do engage in slapstick-inspired comic routines, such as the business with their hats, but they and the events of the play are otherwise distinctly un-Chaplinesque. Vladimir and Estragon find no redemption, love, or much of anything in the drama's action: they wait, they struggle, then they wait again for a man who more than likely will never come. Unlike Chaplin's celluloid adventures, Vladimir and Estragon are denied dramatic closure or any sort of satisfaction, suggesting that in real life, struggle is often not expiated or given meaning. This makes Beckett's two protagonists absurdist representations of the ordinary person in a chaotic, meaningless world.

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