Describe two times in the past when The Giver used his memories to advise the Committee of Elders in chapter 14.

The Giver explains to Jonas that he once advised the Committee of Elders against increasing the population. The Giver had memories of dramatic population booms, which led to starvation and warfare. These memories gave him the wisdom to properly advise the committee. When the pilot accidentally flew over the community, the Giver advised the committee against shooting down the jet. The Giver recalled times when people made hasty decisions out of fear, which led to their destruction.

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As Jonas's training sessions continue, the Giver is forced to transmit painful memories to him on a regular basis. Jonas eventually asks the Giver why they must endure all the painful memories and wonders why the difficult experiences cannot be shared among citizens. The Giver explains that his primary function is to advise the Committee of Elders when they consult him.

The Giver tells Jonas the memories of the past give him the wisdom to make informed decisions. The Committee of Elders consults the Giver before they make a significant policy change. They realize the Giver has the knowledge and experience to prevent them from making costly mistakes and consider his advice on certain subjects.

The Giver then explains the two times the Committee of Elders sought his advice. Before Jonas was selected to be the community's next Receiver of Memory, the Committee of Elders entertained the idea of increasing the population to have more Laborers in the community. They wanted Birthmothers to have four babies instead of three. When the Committee of Elders consulted the Giver about changing the birth policy, the Giver advised against increasing the population. The Giver had centuries-old memories of when the population became so big that people began to starve. The starvation eventually resulted in warfare, which is why he advised against changing the birth rate.

The Giver also informs Jonas that he advised the Committee of Elders when the jet pilot inadvertently flew over the community. The Committee of Elders was terrified and wanted to shoot down the plane. However, the Giver advised them to wait. The Giver relied on the wisdom from his memories and recalled times in the past when people acted out of fear and desperation. Their impulsive actions eventually led to disaster. This is why he advised the Committee of Elders not to destroy the plane.

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In chapter 14, Jonas asks the Giver why it is necessary to endure all the painful memories of the past. The Giver responds by saying that the memories give him wisdom, which allows him to properly advise the Committee of Elders on important decisions. Jonas follows up by asking the Giver what wisdom he gains from experiencing hunger, and the Giver recalls a time when he advised the Committee of Elders on the issue of increasing the population.

The Giver explains that the citizens once petitioned the committee about increasing the birth rate in order to have more Laborers available. When the Committee of Elders sought the Giver's advice, he recalled memories of a population boom, which led to extreme starvation and warfare. The Giver's memories gave him the wisdom necessary to advise the committee against increasing the population.

The second time the Giver advised the committee was on the day the pilot accidentally flew his jet over the community. The committee sought the Giver's advice, and he advised them against shooting down the plane. The Giver tells Jonas that he possesses memories of incidents when people "destroyed others in haste, in fear, and had brought about their own destruction." Jonas then asks the Giver why they can't just share the memories with everyone in the community instead of carrying all the burden themselves. The Giver responds by saying that the committee and community simply want comfort and stability, which is why the Giver and Receiver alone must possess the painful, traumatic memories.

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The Giver advised the committee on expanding the population and dealing with the jet plane that flew over the community. 

Jonas asks The Giver what the purpose of the memories is, because he has difficulty with the painful ones.  The Giver explains to Jonas that the memories give them wisdom, and that the community needs to be able to ask for advice. 

An example The Giver demonstrates is when the Elders considered adding more members to the population, and giving some family units an additional child.  The Giver reflects, and experiences memories of starvation and warfare.  He does not tell the Committee this, he just advises them. 

"They don't want to hear about pain. They just seek the advice. I simply advised them against increasing the population." (Ch. 14) 

The Committee members have no idea where the wisdom comes from.  They just know that the Receiver of Memory knows things they don’t.  It is a position of honor, but not power.  They listen to his advice, and then make their own choices. 

Another example is the jet plane that flew over the community.  It was an accident, because a pilot in training was lost.  The Committee had asked The Giver for advice then too. 

“… They prepared to shoot it down. But they sought my advice. I told them to wait."

"But how did you know? How did you know the pilot was lost?"

"I didn't. I used my wisdom, from the memories. I knew that there had been times in the past--terrible times--when people had destroyed others in haste, in fear, and had brought about their own destruction." (Ch. 14) 

In this case, the plane was not shot down.  The pilot was still released.  He committed an error the community considered unforgivable and had to be punished.  Since no one in the community has memories of death, they have no idea what they are doing when they release someone.

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