Describe the relationship between Rosalind and Orlando in As You Like It.

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Rosalind and Orlando in Shakespeare's classic comedy As You Like It are essentially the personification of true love (although this love seems more like infatuation). They appear to fall in love with each other at first sight, and, in the end, the audience sees them get their happily ever after.

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Rosalind and Orlando in Shakespeare's classic comedy As You Like It are essentially the personification of true love (although this love seems more like infatuation). They appear to fall in love with each other at first sight, and, in the end, the audience sees them get their happily ever after.

The most interesting aspect of their relationship, however, is that they seem to love each other as they are, without having to hide their true selves, which is ironic, as Rosalind is actually disguised as a man for most of the play.

When Rosalind is banished to the Forest of Arden, she disguises herself as a young man (Ganymede) to ensure her safety. Eventually, she encounters Orlando and manages to convince him that she can help him learn the true meaning of love, hoping to see how he truly feels about her. It is never specifically revealed whether or not Orlando knows that Ganymede is actually Rosalind, but he plays along. Thus, the two begin to explore their personalities and characters, revealing their deepest thoughts and emotions layer by layer and ultimately falling in love with each other even more.

The beauty of this relationship, therefore, lies in the fact that Orlando sees Rosalind as a man—as someone who can be his close friend—instead of as someone who can be his lover. Because of this, the two get the chance to really get to know each other as friends and as people first, then as potential lovers. They essentially get the opportunity to truly understand each other and be honest about their feelings rather than be blinded by love.

In the end, they end up marrying each other for love, which was quite rare in Shakespearean times, as many marriages were arranged.

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