Describe the relationship between Jem and Scout in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird.

The relationship between Jem and Scout in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird exemplifies healthy sibling relationships. The siblings share adventures and mischief together, remaining fiercely loyal to each other throughout the plot. Despite an occasional dispute, Jem and Scout are proud of each other and defend each other when necessary.

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Scout and Jem's relationship evolves over the course of the novel, especially when Jem begins to enter adolescence. Nevertheless, the two remain close throughout the story, bonded by the early loss of their mother.

At home and during summers while school is on break and Dill is staying in...

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Scout and Jem's relationship evolves over the course of the novel, especially when Jem begins to enter adolescence. Nevertheless, the two remain close throughout the story, bonded by the early loss of their mother.

At home and during summers while school is on break and Dill is staying in Maycomb, Jem and Scout are inseparable. Jem, as the oldest, sets the terms of the relationship, and Scout conforms by becoming a tomboy. She doesn't want to be left out of any games on the basis of being too girly—and with her no-nonsense attitude, and overalls she never is. Jem can be bossy and think he is superior, but on the whole they get along well and look out for each other.

There are times, such as when Scout starts the first grade, that Jem doesn't want to be seen with her and tells her to keep her distance, though he does walk her to school when Atticus pays him to do so.

As Jem enters adolescence, he begins to pull away from Scout. He is moody and becomes especially upset over the outcome of the Tom Robinson trial. Although his behavior to Scout has always been bossy, now he begins to treat her at times as though he is her father and she his child, which causes fights and tensions. The two, however, stick close together when threats emerge, such as Bob Ewell stalking them on the way home from the Halloween pageant. Jem is protective towards Scout then, and the two grow closer again after surviving the attack.

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Jem is four years older than Scout, and he displays characteristics which are often typical of oldest children. He doesn't really want his younger sister hanging around him at school, which demonstrates that he wants to maintain a certain distance from Scout publicly and in front of his older friends.

At home, however, Jem and Scout are quite close. Neither has a significant friendship (besides Dill, who visits in the summers) with anyone else their ages. They conspire together, invent games together, and try to solve neighborhood mysteries together. They also look out for each other, trying to make sure that Atticus doesn't catch wind of their schemes. Jem is proud of Scout, which is evident when they meet Dill. Jem brags that "Scout yonder's been readin' ever since she was born." Scout is a tomboy who follows her older brother's guidance, and when he hurts, she feels that pain. After the Tom Robinson trial, Jem withdraws from Scout as he tries to process the injustices he has witnessed. Scout reflects that his odd behavior is "probably part of the stage he [is] going through, and I [wish] he would hurry up and get through it." She misses the intimacy she shares with Jem and wants some normalcy restored to their relationship.

At the end of the novel, Jem protects Scout from Bob Ewell as he stalks them in the woods. As her older brother, he is her loyal protector. Regardless of the evil he must face on that dark night, he tries his best to save Scout from harm.

Jem and Scout exemplify the complex nature of healthy sibling relationships. They are incredibly close, sharing secrets and mischief, and are fiercely loyal to each other. Despite the occasional quarrel, Jem and Scout share a deep affection for each other.

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Throughout the novel, Jem and Scout share a relatively typical brother and sister relationship. Jem, being four years older than Scout, considers himself more knowledgeable and has a tendency to boss his little sister around. However, Scout looks up to Jem and believes everything he says, even though Jem drastically misinterprets much of the information he receives as a child. As the novel progresses, Jem begins to spend more time with Dill and focus on becoming a football player. Jem also becomes more authoritative towards Scout, which results in several confrontations between the two siblings. Despite their minor disputes, Jem takes care of Scout and tries his best to protect her. Scout also looks to Jem for advice, and Jem generously shares his understanding of the world around them with his sister. Overall, both siblings respect one another and are always there to comfort each other during difficult situations.

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Jem and Scout are brother and sister, and are Atticus Finch's only children.  Their mother died of natural causes when Scout was little.

On the whole, the two get along fairly well.  They serve as co-conspirators and playmates throughout the book.  When Dill Harris visits Maycomb during the summers, Jem and Scout join him in games that range from riding in a large tire to touching the door of the Radley house.  As Atticus sometimes works late hours, Jem is also given the occasional task to "look after" Scout when Calpurnia is not there.

Like any siblings, there are points of friction as well.  As Jem gets older (he is older than Scout by several years), he tries to distance himself a bit from Scout and often asserts his superior knowledge in a way that drives Scout crazy.  On the whole, however, the two have a strong relationship.

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