Describe the main Jewish religious groups and their theological convictions.

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"We now know that there were many different sub-groups within ancient Judaism, and that the early "Jesus Movement" was just one of many different Jewish groups. ."

There are three main Jewish religious groups or movements that are currently active.  The central tenants of Judaism are the basic building blocks...

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"We now know that there were many different sub-groups within ancient Judaism, and that the early "Jesus Movement" was just one of many different Jewish groups. ."

There are three main Jewish religious groups or movements that are currently active.  The central tenants of Judaism are the basic building blocks of the religion. These movements have the major difference in the how and extent to which one keeps the laws of the Old Testament or Torah.

Judaism is what is termed an ethnoreligious group. In Judaism, one inherits their ethnicity through the maternal side of the family. However, one can convert to Judaism as their religion, without being ethnically Jewish.

The three main Jewish religious groups are: Orthodox Judaism, Conservative Judaism, and Reform Judaism.Orthodox Judaism is the most strict, requiring its' followers to keep the law literally, as is written in the Torah.  Their keeping of the Law is done so strictly, without question. The laws or Torah are considered divine and eternal which means they cannot be altered.

Conservative and Reform Judaism are less strict in the interpretation of following the law (Torah).  However, Conservative Jews tend to have a more traditional interpretation of the law than Reform Jews.

Reform Judaism views the Torah as more of an explanation and recommendation. The views of Orthodox and Conservative Judaism give the Torah the weight of Law, while Reform Judiasm is much more liberal in its' interpretation and practice .

 

 

 

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There are many differences among contemporary Jewish groups. Twentieth and twenty-first century Jews are normally divided into Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform. Orthodox Jews follow the Levitical commands closely, including eating only Kosher foods and following various dietary restrictions (such as not mixing meat and dairy on the same plate), strictly observing the Sabbath, having strongly demarcated gender roles, and generally observing the ritual aspects of the Old Testament quite closely. Reform Jews follow the moral and spiritual tenets of Judaism, but do not interpret the Old Testament as literally true and do not adhere to many of the ritual restrictions. Conservative Jews fall in the middle of the spectrum.

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