Describe the economic, social, and political impact of the National Women Suffrage association.

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The National Women Suffrage Association (NWSA) was founded in 1869 as an outgrowth of American Equal Rights Association (AERA), founded in 1866. Suffrage was a key element of post-Civil War debates about citizenship rights.

The NWSA’s founders, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, placed women’s suffrage at the center...

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The National Women Suffrage Association (NWSA) was founded in 1869 as an outgrowth of American Equal Rights Association (AERA), founded in 1866. Suffrage was a key element of post-Civil War debates about citizenship rights.

The NWSA’s founders, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, placed women’s suffrage at the center of the reforms for which they advocated at the federal level. In contrast, the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA) worked on a state-by-state basis. The NWSA promoted a constitutional amendment that guaranteed universal suffrage and therefore opposed the Fifteenth Amendment because it exclusively recognized the right to vote of African American men, thereby explicitly continuing to exclude all women.

Electing women to office was another important issue. In 1872, Victoria Woodhull became the first female candidate for US President. NWSA actively supported her candidacy, publicizing the hypocrisy allowing women to run for office but not to vote. Anthony’s symbolic gesture of illegally voting in that election further emphasized that contradiction. She was arrested and tried for this act of civil disobedience.

In addition to the vote, the association pressed for married women’s right to property, for which Stanton had successfully lobbied in New York in the 1840s. Another area of activism was concerned with labor reform through promoting women’s representation through unions.

NWSA had its own newspaper, The Revolution. Its officers conducted nationwide speaking tours to keep the issues in the public eye.

In 1890, NWSA merged with AWSA, which was the larger organization, to become the NAWSA.

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