Paul Revere's Ride Questions and Answers
by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

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Describe the British soldiers and the conditions they served under in "Paul Revere's Ride."

In "Paul Revere's Ride," Longfellow describes the British soldiers as an anonymous dark mass of armed men who are “masses and moving shapes of shade” and “a line of black.” Revere hears “the sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,” as he rides past their barracks. They are disciplined, professional military men who are always ready for combat. The massiveness of the British ship is "magnified” by its reflection and compared to ”a prison-bar.”

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In the poem "Paul Revere's Ride," poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow does not describe the British soldiers and the conditions under which they served as thoroughly as he describes the plan that Paul Revere makes to be on the ready to alert the Minute Men (who are fast asleep in their beds in the Middlesex villages and farms of the surrounding towns) that the British are going to attack.

Not surprisingly, the British soldiers are described as an anonymous dark mass of armed men. They are “masses and moving shapes of shade,” and “a line of black, that bends and floats” and Paul Revere can hear “the sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,” as he rides past...

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