Describe the arrival of the ship Pharaon at Marseilles in The Count of Monte Cristo. Who was the owner of the ship?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

On the 24th of February, 1815, the look-out at Notre-Dame de la Garde signaled the three-master, the Pharaon from Smyrna, Trieste, and Naples. (The Count of Monte Christo, book 1, chapter 1)

The ship docked in Marseilles without its master, Captain Leclere, who had died at sea:

"What...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

On the 24th of February, 1815, the look-out at Notre-Dame de la Garde signaled the three-master, the Pharaon from Smyrna, Trieste, and Naples. (The Count of Monte Christo, book 1, chapter 1)

The ship docked in Marseilles without its master, Captain Leclere, who had died at sea:

"What happened to him?" asked the owner, with an air of considerable resignation. "What happened to the worthy captain?"

"He died."

"Fell into the sea?"

"No, sir, he died of brain-fever in dreadful agony." (book 1, chapter 1)

The ship was brought safely home to Marseilles by Edmond Dantès, the first mate, who would later become the Count of Monte Cristo.

The owner of the ship was Monsieur Morrel, a friend and benefactor of Edmond and his father. Despite Edmond's young age, Morrell named him as Captain of the Pharaon, which incited Monsieur Danglars's jealousy and hatred towards Edmond. Danglars was Morrell's agent, who envied Edmond and Morrell's feelings towards him and resented Edmond being named Captain instead of himself.

This envy, jealousy, and hatred caused Danglars to set in motion a series of events intended to destroy Edmond, but Danglars was ultimately destroyed by Edmond. Facing bankruptcy, financial ruin, and prosecution for misappropriating funds to support his all-consuming greed—all of which was brought against Danglars by Edmond—Danglars left his wife and fled the country: penniless, in disgrace, and in fear of his life.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team