Describe Squeaky's attitude towards phoniness and girlishness in "Raymond's Run" by Toni Cade Bambara. 

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In "Raymond's Run" by Toni Cade Bambara , Squeaky's attitudes towards phoniness and girlishness are the same. She does not like either! She is irritated by Cynthia Procter, who, according to Squeaky, is a phony. Cynthia acts like she never practices piano or studies for spelling bees, but...

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In "Raymond's Run" by Toni Cade Bambara, Squeaky's attitudes towards phoniness and girlishness are the same. She does not like either! She is irritated by Cynthia Procter, who, according to Squeaky, is a phony. Cynthia acts like she never practices piano or studies for spelling bees, but then when the time comes for a test or a bee, Cynthia aces it. She also often just happens to sit down on the piano bench and plays as though she is an expert. 

"But of course when I pass her house on my early morning trots around the block, she is practicing the scales on the piano over and over and over and over" (Bambara 3).

To Squeaky, that is like cheating. She does not see anything wrong with practicing in front of people. Squeaky prides herself on working on her running whenever she has an opportunity, and she doesn't care who sees her.

She also thinks it's silly for girls to get all dressed up and dance around the May Pole even though her mother wishes she would "act like a girl for a change" (Bambara 5).m Squeaky believes in being herself, and the person she is is not that little girl dressing up to dance.

"...when you should be trying to be yourself, whatever that is, which is as far as I am concerned, a poor Black girl who really can't afford to buy shoes and a new dress you only wear once a lifetime 'cause it won't fit next year" (Bambara 6).

Squeaky thinks everyone should be himself/herself, not some made-up version that someone else—like a parent or teacher or friend—has in mind. 

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