In what ways did slaves "Africanize" the South?  

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You cannot forcibly or voluntarily import into a region hundreds of thousands of people from distant lands with different histories, cultures, cuisines, etc. and not have those histories, cultures, cuisines, etc. influence the land to which they were brought. Such was the case with the hundreds of thousands of Africans forcibly brought to North America as part of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and with the millions eventually born and bred on this continent. These individuals clung to what they knew best, which was a source of comfort under miserable conditions. African foods, such as red and black-eyed peas, okra, rice, and mixtures of these foods combined into soups and dishes like jambalaya, were imported from Africa and became staples of Southern cuisine.

In addition to food, African slaves brought with them art and music that are today common to the American South. African musical traditions were adapted to the American environment in the form of the most distinctly American form of music, jazz. Jazz is an African American innovation with roots in the American South. Blues, another uniquely American form of music, similarly has its roots firmly in the African American tradition—a tradition born of the misery of slave life and the post-Civil War legacy of slavery. Both jazz and blues developed very large followings that crossed ethnic lines and the popularities of which transcended ages.

These are just two ways in which African influences are felt across the American South. African Americans took justifiable pride in the enduring popularity of these influences in American culture, although in the current highly divisive and emotional environment, concerns about “cultural appropriation” have dampened some of the enthusiasm for cross-cultural assimilation.

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African American influences on the US South began during the period when almost all Africans went to the British colonies and the the United States, as enslaved persons. The ways in which they “Africanized” American life span all aspects. The varied languages of diverse African origins contributed both words, including "gumbo," and forms of speech such as call and response. The multiple musical roots, both in instruments and rhythms, contributed to folk music as well as jazz.

Among the most pronounced influences are found in food, including cuisine and horticulture. Staples of the diet such as rice and sweet potatoes have African roots. The settings and methods through which the crops were grown are equally notable. Through creating and sustaining gardens, enslaved Africans affected southern foodways and the built landscape.

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It was impossible to bring millions of Africans to North America without them leaving a cultural imprint. This occurred despite efforts by slaveholders to stamp out African culture. West African slaves made up one of the largest ethnicities in the United States. Consequently, their culture had a lot of influence. The greatest impact of Africanization occurred in the American South, where most slaves ended up.

One of the greatest impacts of Africans on American culture involves music. Music and dance are an integral part of most West African cultures. What were once unique stylistic elements of their music are now found throughout American music, particularly music genres associated with the South, such as gospel, blues, and jazz. Call and response and polyrhythmic beats, so popular in contemporary American music, have their roots in West Africa. Dance moves such as the shale-downs, struts, shimmies, and jigs also have their origin in West Africa.

African religious elements also made their way to the South. Santería and Vodou are a mix of African religions that were adapted through their journey through the Caribbean and the Southern United States.

Several common household items also have their origins in Africa. Quilted blankets are an African art form brought over to North America and popularized by slaves. Several popular styles of coiled woven baskets came to America this way as well.

Some folktale traditions also are the result of the Africanization of the South. The rabbit is a popular character in African storytelling. He often plays the role of the trickster. This character occurs in several popular Southern folk-tales, such as The Br'er Rabbit.

There are likely many more ways in which slaves brought elements of African culture to the South and to the United States as a whole. Much effort was put into erasing African culture in America. As a result, much of it was practiced in secret and subversive ways or blended with the dominant culture to create something uniquely American.

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Slaves "Africanized" the South by mixing African influences with aspects of contemporary American culture.  Because whites mingled with the slaves, they picked up some aspects of that African-American culture.

Perhaps the most well-recognized aspect of Africanization is musical.  The banjo and the bongo drum are instruments that were created through this mixing of cultures.  Other musical influences permeated Southern culture and eventually led to the development of jazz.

In addition, there were other impacts in areas like food.  Slaves were responsible for the creation of things like barbecue, fried chicken, the use of things like black-eyed peas and various kinds of greens.

By exposing whites to their mixed African/American culture, the slaves, to some extent, Africanized the South.

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