Describe Nora's character in A Doll's House with detail.

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Nora is a complex and dynamic protagonist. In the beginning of A Doll's House , she sometimes bears her husband's outright insults. When she tries to explain that she is thrifty, he replies, "Yes, that's the truth. [You save] everything you can. But that's nothing at all" (1.48). She...

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Nora is a complex and dynamic protagonist. In the beginning of A Doll's House, she sometimes bears her husband's outright insults. When she tries to explain that she is thrifty, he replies, "Yes, that's the truth. [You save] everything you can. But that's nothing at all" (1.48). She puts up with his childish and insulting pet names, such as "squirrel," "featherbrain," and "lark." But Nora is much more than the simple, flighty wife she initially seems to be.

We learn quickly that Nora is a devoted wife. Doctors told her that her husband needed expensive medical treatment in Italy, and she also knew that Torvald would never pay for it. So she took out a loan and committed forgery in order to obtain the funds and save his life, never mentioning this to Torvald. She's secretly been working side jobs and stashing some of her "allowance" to pay back her debt. And still, she listens without complaint as her husband accuses her of constantly wasting money, and she continues to endure his infantilizing treatment. She's faithful and willing to overlook his faults.

Yet, eventually, she realizes that the love she longs for doesn't exist. When her husband finally realizes the truth of her actions, his first priority is to save himself:

In all these eight years—she who was my pride and joy—a hypocrite, a liar—worse, worse—a criminal! How infinitely disgusting it all is! The shame! I should have suspected something of the kind. I should have known. All your father's flimsy values. (3.236)

Nora begins to see Torvald for what he is: another man who wants to rule over her.

That's the point right three: you've never understood me. I've been wronged greatly, Torvald—first by Papa, and then by you.

Nora realizes that she is strong enough to strive for more. She doesn't have to be boxed into the role of a doting daughter or a serving wife. She leaves in a quest of "absolute freedom" (3.360) in search of more.

Nora is willing to lose everything and walk away from her life completely empty-handed because she is strong enough to know that she will be okay.

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Nora first appears childlike and obedient towards her husband Torvald. However, it soon becomes clear that this is a well-constructed act, performed for his pleasure, and does not remotely illustrate the extent of Nora's character. Nora actually is leading somewhat of a double life, secretly saving away money to pay off a debt that she took without his permission and for his benefit, out of the belief that he would do the same for her. Eventually Torvald learns this secret and is outraged. As soon as he realizes he doesn't have control of Nora, of his perfect doll's house and his perfect doll, he is furious. Through this, Nora discovers that her belief that Torvald would sacrifice himself for her, as she had done for him, is shattered, and she chooses to leave. Ultimately, while Nora is unwilling to play the part of a doll and to be cast aside.

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In A Doll's House by Ibsen, Nora is the main character. The first opens with Nora humming. She is excited about Christmas and the shopping she has done. While Nora appears to be very happy, she is keeping up a facade. Nora is not truly happy. Even though she skips around and sings like a lark, she has a troubled life. She is carrying around secrets from her husband Torvald. She is a very caring wife who is totally devoted to her husband and children:

Nora is the "doll" wife of Torvald. She is sensitive, sensible, and completely unaware of her own worth until the last act of the play. She initially appears flighty and excitable. Nora is most concerned with charming her husband and being the perfect wife; she is also secretive and hides her thoughts and actions from her husband even when there is no real benefit in doing so.

In Torvald's presence, Nora seems to adore him. She caters to his every whim. She seems to worship Torvald and her children. When Torvald calls her nicknames, she does not seem to mind. She even does tricks for Torvald. She acts as a child or Torvald treats her as a child. She would do anything for Torvald's happiness. In fact, she puts herself in stress by borrowing money behind Torvald's back to save his life. This secret weighs Nora down. She is under tremendous pressure trying to find the money to pay back the loan. Keeping this secret from her husband puts a strain on Nora's marriage.

Truly, Nora pretends to be happy throughout the drama. It is not until the end of the play that Nora gets tired of keeping up the facade. By the end of the drama, Nora has played house long enough. She is tired of being Torvald's doll. She determines to leave
Torvald and her children. Torvald's reaction to the letter from Krogstad opens Nora's eyes. She realizes that Torvald cares more about his reputation than he does his own wife. Torvald yells at her and calls her scattered brained. This action causes Nora to see the truth. Torvald loves himself and his reputation more than he loves Nora. For this reason, she cannot stay. She walks out the door, leaving her husband and doll house behind.

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