Describe Mr Lorry from "A Tale of Two Cities." Looks and character

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Dickens offers us a long description of Mr. Lorry, a figure of English integrity and virtue, as he breakfasts in a coffee room. He wears brown, and his suit is of good quality if not brand new. It has large cuffs and large flaps for its pockets. His stockings are...

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Dickens offers us a long description of Mr. Lorry, a figure of English integrity and virtue, as he breakfasts in a coffee room. He wears brown, and his suit is of good quality if not brand new. It has large cuffs and large flaps for its pockets. His stockings are brown too. The color brown represents his down-to-earth solidity and his lack of decadent flash.

Mr. Lorry wears a flaxen wig and is generally a healthy-looking man of sixty. His linen, though not of the highest quality, is very white, symbolizing his purity. Dickens makes much of its whiteness, writing:

His linen, though not of a fineness in accordance with his stockings, was as white as the tops of the waves that broke upon the neighbouring beach, or the specks of sail that glinted in the sunlight far at sea.

Mr. Lorry's good health appears in his fine, strong legs, of which he is a little "vain," and the healthy color in his cheeks. He doesn't look stressed. His face is controlled and quiet, but Dickens suggests he has a heart that feels passionately by noting that his face is lit up by his "moist bright eyes" and that it must have cost some effort to control and make those eyes look quiet and impassive.

One instinctively trusts his unassuming character, and we can also see how he can blend in easily with a crowd and go unnoticed as he helps people.

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Jarvis Lorry is the representative of Tellson's Bank, an old, respected and established English institution. He is a modest dresser, about sixty years old, and likes to show off his developed calves. He is not overly handsome, but not unattractive as a person.  He in instrumental in helping many people who have been imprisoned or exiled as a result of the Revolution and bringing them back to England.  As a character, he is the epitome of English virtue.  His chief purpose is to move the plot along and to illuminate the theme of imprisonment and redemption which happens to so many other characters in this book.

 

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