Describe Mildred Montag from Fahrenheit 451. What is her function in the novel and what does she represent?

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Mildred is an obedient citizen. She lives vicariously through the lives of her "family" on the parlour shows. Therefore, he real life is basically empty. Her relationship with Montag is superficial at best. She does not spend any significant time with him, let alone talk about anything meaningful. She is...

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Mildred is an obedient citizen. She lives vicariously through the lives of her "family" on the parlour shows. Therefore, he real life is basically empty. Her relationship with Montag is superficial at best. She does not spend any significant time with him, let alone talk about anything meaningful. She is mentally pacified by the parlour shows and this effectively shuts out the real world. She also takes pills to physically pacify herself. She is exactly what the firemen and authorities want: an obedient citizen who does not challenge authority and who does not think for herself. Mildred is so oblivious and thoughtless about the real world, that she forgets to tell Montag that Clarisse had been killed: 

Whole family moved out somewhere. But she's gone for good. I think she's dead. 

No. The same girl. McClellan. McClellan, Run over by a car. Four days ago. I'm not sure. But I think she's dead. The family moved out anyway. I don't know. But I think she's dead. 

As part of his awakening and transformation, Montag must rebel against the society that promotes thoughtlessness. Therefore, he must try to persuade Mildred to wake up as well or he must eventually abandon her. Mildred functions as Montag's last personal tie to his old life. Finally letting her go will be part of his transition from his old life to his new life. 

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