Describe Lennie and George's dream for the future.

Lennie and George are best friends, and George travels with Lennie and takes care of him because he is mentally handicapped. George and Lennie's dream for the future is to one day own a farm with lots of rabbits. Lennie dreams of taking care of the rabbits and other animals, and George hopes this dream comes true so that he can lead a "better" life.

 

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George and Lennie dream of owning their own farm. The dream is introduced in chapter one while the two men are camped in the clearing between the Gabilan Mountains and the Salinas River. It is apparently a long standing dream because George indicates that Lennie always seems to bring it up. For George it is a goal which will allow him to have the freedom of making his own decisions and quit the constant traveling around from job to job which is what he and Lennie have been doing ever since Lennie's Aunt Clara died. George dreams of the day when he doesn't have to listen to a boss or worry about getting "canned" (fired). He wants to see the profit of his own work and not be responsible to anyone else. George describes the dream farm, but there is obviously a frustration in George's words that the dream will never be realized:

“Well,” said George, “we’ll have a big vegetable patch and a rabbit hutch and chickens. And when it rains in the winter, we’ll just say the hell with goin’ to work, and we’ll build up a fire in the stove and set around it an’ listen to the rain comin’ down on the roof—Nuts!”

For Lennie the dream is linked to his obsession with petting soft things. He looks forward to going to the dream farm because George has promised him that he will get to take care of the rabbits. George hopes he can control Lennie's behavior by warning him that he won't get to "tend" the rabbits if he gets in trouble. 

The dream is like a paradise to the two men who are later joined by Candy and Crooks in the hope that one day they can all go off to the dream farm and "live nice" without worries, in the presence of friends and people that care about each other. The dream farm is a stark contrast to the alienation and loneliness which pervades life on the ranch where the men work. Unfortunately, of course, the dream is never realized as the "plans of mice and men often go astray."

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George and Lennie dream of saving up their money and purchasing their own small farm.

This is a part of the American Dream of land ownership that is largely out of the reach of migrant workers like George and Lennie. They crave it because it would give them a chance to put down roots and become part of a community, rather than wandering constantly in search of work. They dream of the independence it would give them, including the chance to take a day off if they felt like it. Further, rather than having to share a bunkhouse with strangers, some of whom can be unpleasant, they could surround themselves with friends.

Lennie dreams of raising rabbits, and George comforts him when they are both feeling down by conjuring an image of the bounty the farm would produce. This modest dream helps sustain them through the rough times they have faced in the Great Depression. Other ranch hands are also inspired by the dream and ask to be a part of it.

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George and Lennie's dream for the future is to eventually purchase their own estate, where they can "live off the fatta the lan’" and do as they please. On their estate, George and Lennie will be their own bosses and make a living by selling the crops they grow. Lennie will also have his own rabbit hutch, where he can tend and raise as many rabbits as he desires.

As migrant workers traveling throughout the western United States constantly looking for jobs, George and Lennie long for stability and a place to call their own. Throughout the story, Lennie continually asks George to recite their dream, which gives them a respite from their harsh reality. Candy ends up overhearing them talking about their dream and offers to give them his life savings to help purchase and live on the estate. Tragically, George and Lennie's dream never comes to fruition after Lennie accidentally kills Curley's wife.

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In Of Mice and Men, Lennie and George are best friends.  Lennie is obviously mentally handicapped and George travels with him and takes care of him.  They dream of one day owning their own farm.  They hope that one day they will be their own bosses and live off of the land.

After calming down, George repeats, at Lennie's request, the story of how they are someday going to get out of the lonely life of itinerant farm laborers and buy a piece of land where they can live by working their own small farm together.

The idea of having their own land and farm excites Lennie very much.  He dreams of taking care of the rabbits and other animals.  George hopes this dream comes true so that he can lead a "better" life.

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George and Lennie are itinerant workers; they travel together from place to place, doing ranch and farm labor. Living this way is ultimately not sustainable. They have not managed to put down roots in any one place. The men have left many different workplaces, primarily because Lennie, who has an intellectual disability, always misunderstands a situation; because he has tremendous physical strength, he has been involved in violent altercations.

Their dream is to own “a couple of acres” where they can farm and raise cows and pigs. Stability and ownership are two things that are very important to George. He also wants to provide an environment in which Lennie will be safe from aggressive, prejudiced people. For Lennie, staying with his friend is a higher priority; he is also an animal lover, and he wants to have rabbits.

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I would suggest that the dream that George and Lennie have is to find something permanent and lasting in a world that is mutable and temporal. The dream that George and Lennie have of owning a small farm in which George could be his own boss and Lennie could tend the rabbits becomes their driving force. In a condition where the "bindle stiff" migrant worker moves from place to place, collecting their "bit" and then going to the next setting, George and Lennie wish to do something else. Their dream is one that features roots. While their state of being is a rootless existence because they go to where the work is, their dreams reflect a hopeful opposite of such a condition.

The material reality in which they experience so much brutality and hardship does not limit their ability to envision a world that is fundamentally different and better from where they are. Their dream is a reflection of this condition. It is one in which roots, optimism, and autonomy are evident, precisely constructed because these elements are not present in the life they are living. Essentially, I would describe George's and Lennie's dream in Of Mice and Men as an example of what life can and should be as opposed to how life is.

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In chapter 1 of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, we find George and Lennie on the way to Soledad. They are going to become farm hands in that town. George and Lennie are two men who are bonded together by a family-like force that has grown with them since they were children. Lennie, a mentally disabled man, is completely dependent on George for protection and clarity. George is the leader of the dyad, and often protects Lennie- from the dangers and accidents that Lennie's out of the ordinary physical strength can cause.

George is also the leader when it comes to their plans and dreams. He has figured out a dream, which he talks about as if it were a plan. Lennie totally agrees and wishes for the same dream.

In it, George and Lennie reach their own American Dream: A place to call their own, where they can enjoy the fruits of their work on their own and with each other, not for anyone else.

"O.K. Someday- we're gonna get the jack together and we're gonna have a little house and a couple of acres an' a cow and some pigs and-"
"An' live off the fatta the lan'," Lennie shouted

Further on George seems to resent the fact that all their lives they have had to live like slaves, always producing, always farming, always plucking and harvesting great things that end up going somewhere else. Why can't they just keep what is theirs?

"we'll have a big vegetable patch and a
rabbit hutch and chickens.

However, their dream is much less about harvest and much more about freedom: The freedom to not HAVE to work. The freedom to enjoy what they work for, and what they believe is their right to keep. It is a dream for peace, comfort, and joy.

And when it rains in the winter, we'll just say the hell with goin' to work, and we'll build up a fire in the stove and set around it an' listen to the rain comin' down on the roof.

Therefore, George and Lennie's dream is quite simple: To live off the fat of the land. After all, the land had chewed and spat them alive, has taken away their freedom, their capacity of sustenance, and part of their dignity.

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