Describe Ichabod Crane from "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow."

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Crane is an oddball city man who is described as being "useful and agreeable"  with a "gentlemanlike personage, of vastly superior taste" in comparison to the male inhabitants of Sleepy Hollow.  This is only the superficial look at Ichabod.     

Ichabod was commonly invited to the homes of his...

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Crane is an oddball city man who is described as being "useful and agreeable"  with a "gentlemanlike personage, of vastly superior taste" in comparison to the male inhabitants of Sleepy Hollow.  This is only the superficial look at Ichabod.     

Ichabod was commonly invited to the homes of his pupils, especially those with attractive sisters.   He enjoyed the company of others but even more so, he is described as a lover of food with quite an appetite.  In addition, he imagines being involved in the cooking process: 

The pedagogue’s mouth watered as he looked upon this sumptuous promise of luxurious winter fare.

Ichabod possesses an insatiable appetite, which is also a reflection of his ulterior motives.  Though he appears as being the affable, educated school master, he is actually a man of hidden greed, particularly because of his great fondness for Katrina and his dream to have with her "a whole family of children" along with taking the land he'd inherit and "readily turn to cash."   

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Lets note as well that Ichabod is an unfair teacher in many ways.  He played favorites with the students and often overlooked the wrong doings of smaller, skinnier children.  Here is the explanation from Irving:

He administered justice with discrimination rather than severity; taking the burden off the backs of the weak, and laying it on those of the strong. Your mere puny stripling, that winced at the least flourish of the rod, was passed by with indulgence; but the claims of justice were satisfied by inflicting a double portion on some little tough wrong-headed, broad-skirted Dutch urchin, who sulked and swelled and grew dogged and sullen beneath the birch.

It would seem that Ichabod is favoring students who look more like him and punishing those that look more like his rival, Brom Bones. 

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Ichabod Crane is a tall skinny school teacher. He is conscientious and while he loves the children he teaches, he can be very stern when it comes to their studies. He loves storytelling and often times allows his imagination to run wildly away from him. He is a daydreamer to the point of severe distraction. He loves women and he especially loves women who cook good food. Next to storytelling, food is his greatest passion. He is not a very strong man either physically or mentally and is easily goaded by Brom Bones throughout the story. He is much more sensitive and more feminine than the very masculine and burly Brom who wins the heart of Katrina, which in truth Ichabod only wanted her for her family's lush estate in the first place. This shows his selfishness and concern only for his own well being.

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Irving's description of Crane as angular, awkward, and uncomfortable in his own skin echoes the man's sense of self:   "His head was small, and flat at top, with huge ears, large green glassy eyes, and a long snipe nose, so that it looked like a weather-cock perched upon his spindle neck to tell which way the wind blew.. his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending upon the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield."

If you consider these physical attributes as reflections of the soul, you have all you need to know about the character of Ichabod Crane.  His head was "small."  In the early 1800s,  a small head was indicitive of a small mind, one of the many beliefs in "phrenology," the pseudo-science of interpreting personality by examing the skull, as is the idea that his head was "flat." 

Crane's "glassy eyes" indicate, properly, that he is unable to "see' clearly, both literally and symbolically.  His "snipe"-like nose conveys cruelness.  His neck and clothing, reminiscient of a corpse, are much like the descriptions of the dreaded Headless Horseman.  Through his descriptive horrors, Irving conveys more than a ghost story:  he hints, rather strongly, at a psychological abberrance; which, in part, may be attributed to the torn allegiances between the new world and the old. 

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Crane is described as tall and thin, awkward and clumsy, and with a voracious appetite. He has large feet, long arms, and is overall a comical figure to see.  Washington Irving describes Ichabod Crane in great detail, and perhaps re-reading the first portion of the book where he is described would help you find all the details.  In addition, you can check out the links below for more information.

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