To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

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How do Scout and Jem mature through Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird?

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Gretchen Mussey eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Both Jem and Scout mature into morally upright individuals with sympathy and perspective. At the beginning of the novel, both Jem and Scout fear Boo Radley and do not understand the prejudice throughout their community. Both children learn valuable lessons and experience significant events, which affect their perspective of life. Jem learns about real courage from his experience with Mrs. Dubose, and Scout learns about perspective from her interaction with Miss Caroline. Atticus also teaches his children important lessons concerning race, respect, tolerance, and equality. After witnessing racial injustice for the first time, both Jem and Scout lose their childhood innocence. Although Jem becomes jaded, he realizes the importance of standing up for what is right. Scout also understands the importance of protecting innocent beings and comprehends the significance of her father's defense of Tom Robinson. By the end of the novel, neither child fears Boo Radley, and both of the Finch children...

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Gracie O'Hara eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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