Describe how the civil liberties guaranteed by the Bill of Rights make it more difficult for law enforcement to catch and convict criminals.

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The Fifth Amendment protects people against self-incrimination. One can also not be tried twice for the same crime. This makes it difficult to convict criminals because the law has to make sure that it has an ironclad case before going to court. This is difficult without many witnesses and concrete...

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The Fifth Amendment protects people against self-incrimination. One can also not be tried twice for the same crime. This makes it difficult to convict criminals because the law has to make sure that it has an ironclad case before going to court. This is difficult without many witnesses and concrete evidence.

The Fourth Amendment prohibits police searches without a warrant. Even when a warrant is supplied, it usually spells out explicitly what can and cannot be searched. Even if the police find incriminating evidence, if it goes beyond the scope of the warrant, it may be tossed out as inadmissible evidence in court. This means that the police must be relatively sure of guilt before they can proceed to investigate. This gives the criminals time to tamper with evidence or escape.

The Sixth Amendment guarantees a jury trial of one's peers. Prosecution must select an impartial jury, and the defense attorney can also weed out potential jurors. When there is any doubt of a biased juror, that juror is usually removed from the case. Everyone on trial for a crime is provided with an attorney.

While the Bill of Rights is designed to protect people from living in a police state without civil liberties, those same civil liberties also hinder law enforcement officials from quickly catching offenders before they can either escape or commit further crimes. The convicted face their witnesses and are aware of everyone associated with the trial; this may lead to fear of retaliation later.

Further interpretations of the Fifth Amendment have prevented spouses from being called upon to testify against one another. The Bill of Rights has been good for the nation as a whole; however, it has also protected potential criminals as well.

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The civil liberties guaranteed by the Bill of Rights make it harder to capture and convict criminals. For example, the Fifth Amendment protects a person from testifying against himself or herself. Additionally, a person cannot be tried twice for the same crime.

The Fourth Amendment makes it illegal for the police to search a person’s home unless the police obtain a search warrant. In order to obtain a search warrant, the police must present probable cause in order to be granted the search warrant.

The Sixth Amendment guarantees a person the right to a speedy trial by an impartial jury. The trial should occur within the district where the alleged crime occurred. Also, the people on trial have the right to know the charges brought against them. They have the right to an attorney. They also must be able to try to obtain witnesses who can testify in their favor. They also must be able to confront the witnesses testifying against them.

These provisions make it more difficult to capture and convict criminals. There was a significant concern that people’s rights might be violated with the adoption of the new Constitution, which led to the addition of a Bill of Rights. These amendments protect the rights of all of the citizens, including those accused of crimes.

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Civil liberties are different from civil rights. Civil rights protect people from discriminatory or unequal treatment. Civil liberties, however, are those rights guaranteed by the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and established US case law. Civil liberties guaranteed by the Bill of Rights that make it more difficult for law enforcement to catch and convict criminals include the following five:

4th amendment: This amendment protects against unreasonable search and seizure and issuing a search warrant without probable cause. In other words, the police cannot simply go "fishing" for a crime without reasonable evidence that a crime was committed.

5th amendment: This amendment protects you from being forced to testify against yourself, being tried twice for the same crime, or being tried without a formal charge. You also cannot have your property seized. 

6th amendment: This amendment guarantees a speedy trial, the right to be informed of the charges against you, to confront witnesses, to call witnesses, and to have a lawyer represent you.

7th amendment: This amendment allows you to have a trial by jury.

8th amendment: This amendment provides protection against excessive fines, bails, and cruel and unusual punishment.

It is notable that five of the first ten amendments treat crime and the legal system and are meant to protect people against the government finding ways to punish people unjustly.

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If it were not for the 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendments, it would be much easier for law enforcement to catch and convict criminals.  While this would be good in some ways, it would also make our country more like a police state.

The 4th Amendment makes it hard to catch criminals because it requires the police to have probable cause to get warrants before they search or arrest people.  The police could catch many more criminals if they were allowed to search any person or any home just because they wanted to or because they thought the person was connected to a crime.

The 5th Amendment makes it harder to catch criminals because it guarantees that suspects cannot be made to incriminate themselves.  Police cannot force people to confess.  They have to inform suspects of their right to remain silent until they have an attorney.  Without these constraints, the police could catch more criminals.

The 6th Amendment makes convicting criminals more difficult.  It gives them the right to an attorney.  It gives them the right to a jury trial.  It gives them the right to confront and cross-examine witnesses against them.  By giving defendants all these rights, it makes it harder to convict them.

In these ways, the Bill of Rights makes it harder for law enforcement to catch and convict criminals.  However, it also prevents us from living in a police state.

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