Describe the Ghost of Christmas Present. Explain what it shows Scrooge, what it teaches Scrooge, and what Scrooge learns from it.

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The Ghost of Christmas Present appears to Scrooge in Dickens' novel as a "jolly giant." The robed Ghost carries a cornucopia-like torch, and he can be seen around a large feast, which reinforces the "jolly giant" theme. The animated Disney film adaptation, "Mickey's Christmas Carol" actually does a good job...

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The Ghost of Christmas Present appears to Scrooge in Dickens' novel as a "jolly giant." The robed Ghost carries a cornucopia-like torch, and he can be seen around a large feast, which reinforces the "jolly giant" theme. The animated Disney film adaptation, "Mickey's Christmas Carol" actually does a good job of depicting the Ghost of Christmas Present and his massive feast in a way that remains pretty true to the Dickens' story, at least in part.

The Ghost of Christmas Present escorts Scrooge around the city, showing him Christmas warmth, cheer and festive gatherings as well as the misery and deprivation that exist in stark contrast to the holiday merriment. The Ghost shows Scrooge the home of Scrooge's impoverished clerk, Bob Cratchit, father of Tiny Tim, the oft-cited crutches-using character from the novel.

Responding to Scrooge's question about Tiny Tim upon seeing the young boy's crutch, the Ghost tells Ebenezer that Tim will die if, in effect, the future doesn't differ radically from the present. Here, and shortly after when the Ghost shows Scrooge two starving children, the giant apparition throws some of Scrooge's more callous words uttered earlier in the novel back at him in these different contexts. This highlights in a wry way for the wealthy miser how indifferent to human suffering his remarks and actions regarding the mass of poverty-stricken and working poor people had been, teaching him about the heartlessness and consequences of his miserly disposition. 

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