In Silas Marner, describe Eppie now that 16 years have passed.

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After the passage of sixteen years, Eppie is an eighteen-year-old beauty. She feels a little self-conscious about her seemingly unruly hair but is otherwise sanguine in temperament. The teenage Eppie is also described as a loving daughter to Silas in chapter 16. After Sunday services, she sets the table and...

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After the passage of sixteen years, Eppie is an eighteen-year-old beauty. She feels a little self-conscious about her seemingly unruly hair but is otherwise sanguine in temperament. The teenage Eppie is also described as a loving daughter to Silas in chapter 16. After Sunday services, she sets the table and serves Silas his dinner.

For his part, Silas is content to watch his daughter play with their pets as he eats. Having been reared with great love by Silas, Eppie is a confident, happy, and well-adjusted young woman. She is shown to have an easy, open relationship with her adopted father.

In chapter 16, Eppie mentions that she is entertaining the thought of marrying Aaron Winthrop, Dolly's son. During her conversation with Silas, Eppie reassures him that he will not be alone even if she marries Aaron. Her words demonstrate her deep affection and solicitude for the old man.

In chapter 19, Eppie demonstrates her loyalty to Silas by refusing Godfrey and Nancy's offer. Seeing her adopted father's distress at the idea of her going away, Eppie stands firm. She tells Godfrey that she can never be happy living with him, knowing that Silas will be alone. Eppie will never leave Silas, because they have been together since the day she wandered into his home. Godfrey is stunned by Eppie's decided stance, but she remains firm in her resolution. In this scene, Eppie's loyal nature is clearly demonstrated.

So, after sixteen years, Eppie is a happy, well-adjusted young woman. She is also loyal, kind, and loving.

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We are given a sight of Eppie and how she has changed in the sixteen year interim that happens between the end of Book I and the beginning of Book II of this fascinating novel. We are first shown the church at the end of the service, with the people exiting, in order of their social position. Thus it is that we are introduced to Godfrey Cass and his wife, Nancy, after 16 years, and likewise Silas Marner, though with a much transformed companion. Note how Eppie is described in the text:

...but there is the freshest blossom of youth close by his side--a blonde dimpled girl of eighteen, who has vainly tried to chastise her curly auburn hair into smoothness under her brown bonnet: the hair ripples as obstinately as a brooklet under the March breeze, and the little ringlets burst away from the restraining comb behind and show themselves below the bonnet-crown.

Eppie has therefore grown up during the interim into a very attractive young lady with distinctive hair, which could perhaps symbolise her zest for life.

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